Advanced Manufacturing Office Sustainable Chemistry in

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Advanced Manufacturing Office Sustainable Chemistry in

Transcript Of Advanced Manufacturing Office Sustainable Chemistry in

Advanced Manufacturing Office
Sustainable Chemistry in Manufacturing Processes Roundtable
Summary Report
November 17, 2020

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The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) partners with industry, small business, universities, and other stakeholders to identify and invest in emerging technologies with the potential to create high-quality domestic manufacturing jobs and enhance the global competitiveness of the United States. This document was prepared as a collaborative effort between DOE AMO, Boston Government Services, and Energetics.
Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.
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Table of Contents
1. Executive Summary ..................................................................................................................................... 6 2. Background and Roundtable Proceedings.................................................................................................. 8
Background .................................................................................................................................................. 8 Roundtable Overview................................................................................................................................... 9
Roundtable Purpose.............................................................................................................................. 9 3. Roundtable Participant Perspectives and Common Themes ...................................................................11
Pre-meeting Participant Viewpoints........................................................................................................... 11 Industry Perspective Themes...................................................................................................................... 12
Chemical Manufacturing Processes.................................................................................................... 13 Scalability ........................................................................................................................................... 14 Supply Chain ...................................................................................................................................... 14 Information Sharing and Collaboration .............................................................................................. 14 Analysis (TEA and LCA) ................................................................................................................... 15 Other Common Themes ..................................................................................................................... 15 Association Perspectives ............................................................................................................................ 16 Need for Federal Funding................................................................................................................... 16 Economics and Co-Benefits Already Driving Sustainable Chemistry Adoption ............................... 16 Legacy Systems Remain a Large Barrier ........................................................................................... 16 Wide-Ranging Energy Benefits.......................................................................................................... 17 A Broad Approach to Growth is Best................................................................................................. 17 Summary of Group Breakout Discussions ................................................................................................. 18 Breakout Group 1 ............................................................................................................................... 18 Breakout Group 2 ............................................................................................................................... 18 Breakout Group 3 ............................................................................................................................... 18 4.The Research and development Needs to Accelerate Sustainable Chemical Manufacturing ................. 23 5. Roundtable Conclusion..............................................................................................................................24 Appendix A. Agenda........................................................................................................................................25 Appendix B. List of Roundtable Participants .................................................................................................27 Appendix C. List of Acronyms.........................................................................................................................28 Appendix D. Summary of Attendee Questionnaire Results...........................................................................29 Appendix E. Summary of Interactive Meeting Prompts.................................................................................33
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List of Figures
Figure 1. Common Industry Perspective Themes for Sustainable Chemistry in Manufacturing.......................... 6 Figure 2. Three Pillars of the AMO Program ....................................................................................................... 9 Figure 3. Participating stakeholders from the chemical sector. .......................................................................... 10 Figure 4. Common Industry Perspective Themes for Sustainable Chemistry in Manufacturing........................ 13 Figure 5. Breakout Group 1, Barriers and R&D Needs for Sustainable Chemistry in Manufacturing ............... 19 Figure 6. Breakout Group 2, Barriers and R&D Needs for Sustainable Chemistry in Manufacturing ............... 20 Figure 7. Breakout Group 3, Barriers and R&D Needs for Sustainable Chemistry in Manufacturing ............... 21
List of Tables
Table 1. Summary of Gaps, Opportunities and Research Needs for Sustainable Chemistry in Manufacturing Processes............................................................................................................................................................... 7 Table 2. Summary of Pre-Meeting Questionnaire Results. Parentheses indicate the number of submitters that mentioned the concept. ....................................................................................................................................... 29
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1. Executive Summary

The Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Green Chemistry & Commerce Council (GC3) co-hosted a virtual roundtable on Sustainable Chemistry in Manufacturing Processes on November 17, 2020, to collect industry stakeholders’ perspectives on incorporating sustainable chemistry manufacturing practices into the manufacturing of consumer and commercial products. In attendance were 42 representatives from industry, trade associations, and academia.

This report summarizes the presentations and small group discussions that took place at this event. Note that the results presented here are a snapshot of the viewpoints

Figure 1. Common Industry Perspective Themes for Sustainable Chemistry in Manufacturing

expressed by the experts who attended the roundtable and may not necessarily reflect the outlooks of the

broader stakeholder community. The first half of the event included five-minute presentations from 16

representatives of businesses throughout the sustainable chemistry manufacturing supply chain, from chemical

industry suppliers to formulators and retailers. Following the presentations, attendees participated in facilitated

discussions regarding technology and commercialization barriers to sustainability and the research and

development (R&D) needs to address those barriers in order to incorporate sustainable chemistry

manufacturing practices into the manufacturing of consumer and commercial products.

To prepare for the facilitated discussions, a pre-meeting questionnaire was distributed to the participants to capture their diverse perspectives (see Appendix D for questions and compiled results). This information was supplemented by information gathered during the morning session’s industry presentation series. Five common themes emerged.

Scalability
Scalability applies to both sustainable feedstock supply, which must be ramped up for commercial production, and new sustainable chemistry processes, which must progress from laboratory and prototype units to commercial-scale units. Both aspects are important for de-risking new sustainable products and processes.

Information-Sharing and Collaboration
All parties in the supply chain, from manufacturers to retailers, must have access to the same information about the chemicals used in any product to fully understand the potential for improvement.

Supply Chain Integration
Although related to scalability and information-sharing, this theme focuses on the need for a complete understanding of the lifecycle of a new product before it is manufactured. This knowledge is critical for circularity in the supply chain so product “waste” can become a raw material to manufacture a new product.

Technoeconomic and Lifecycle Analyses
Well-founded technoeconomic and lifecycle analyses (TEA and LCA, respectively) depend on reliable data. To compare sustainability factors across sustainable products and processes, analyses of sustainable products must employ a common language and standardized metrics.

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Chemical Manufacturing Processes
Participants shared their successes using sustainable practices and processes to reduce and conserve energy, but further R&D of energy-efficient manufacturing processes is needed for wide acceptance of sustainable chemistry in manufacturing.

Using the common themes identified above as a starting point, the facilitated discussions addressed key opportunities for continued advances in sustainable chemistry, identified knowledge gaps, explored technology and commercialization barriers to sustainability, and determined the research and development (R&D) needs to address those barriers and realize the opportunities. A high-level summary of these are outlined in Table 1.

Table 1. Summary of Gaps, Opportunities and Research Needs for Sustainable Chemistry in Manufacturing Processes

Critical Knowledge Gaps

Key Research and Development Opportunities

Sustainable Manufacturing Products & Processes Sustainable Manufacturing Products & Processes

• Sustainable materials to substitute for currently available materials
• Performance, toxicity and environmental impact information on sustainable products
• Precision engineering to develop technologies in industrial settings
• Competition with legacy capital equipment and cost optimization for traditional petrochemical based products

• Process intensification approaches that dramatically reduce energy requirements
• Sustainable chemistry solutions that are materials and processes for applications across many sectors (e.g. sustainable surfactants for use in detergents, cleaning products, soap products, etc.)
• Adaptation of existing manufacturing platforms for sustainable manufacturing to reduce risk

Circularity

Circularity

• Post-consumer waste stream obscures information about its origins inhibiting use as feedstock
• Consideration of product lifespan, including everything from disposable packaging to longlasting end products

• Put sustainability into consideration during the product design phase so the final product can be designed to be sustainable
• Development of solvent dissolution/depolymerization chemistries to enable recycling of wastes back into new products

Scaling Sustainable Manufacturing Processes

Scaling Sustainable Manufacturing Processes

• Sustainable manufacturing processes that produce commercial quantities of product while meeting performance requirements
• Supply chain bottlenecks for sustainable raw materials and feedstocks
• Availability of sustainable raw materials and feedstocks at cost-competitive commercial scales

• Common scalable pilot testing facility in a collaborative setting, with modular and flexible processes prioritized
• Adaptation of existing manufacturing platforms for sustainable manufacturing to reduce risk

Analyses – TEA and LCA

Analyses – TEA and LCA

• Lack of consistent data for TEA/LCA • No common language for TEA/LCA

• Establishment of standard protocols for evaluating products
• TEA/LCA based on primary information, not secondary information
• Tools to help quantify environmental impacts and the value proposition to facilitate communication and prioritization

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COLLABORATION NEEDS
• Information-sharing platform to share compositional and LCA data up and down the supply chain • Collaboration across the supply chain to identify R&D opportunities • Collaboration to bring successful R&D outcomes to scale
2. Background and Roundtable Proceedings
Background
The chemical industry is an important part of the U.S. economy and is the largest exporting sector in the United States, accounting for over 12% of the world’s total chemical production, making the United States the second-largest chemical-producing nation.1 More than 96% of the world’s manufactured goods are enabled by chemistry, from the production of food and clean drinking water to medicines, cleaners, personal care products, and a host of other products that contribute to virtually every aspect of modern life. The industry is directly responsible for creating more than 500,000 jobs and indirectly for several million additional jobs via industry suppliers.
Energy is an important component of the costs within the chemical industry and, for some energy-intensive chemical products, can account for up to 85% of the total production costs.2 Since 2010, shale gas production in North America has been causing a dramatic shift in production costs. Today, the United States is among the lowest-cost producers in the world, attracting record levels of investment in new facilities and expanded production capacity. This shift is also presenting new research and development (R&D) opportunities that may enable smaller-scale, modular manufacturing that can enable competitive processes as alternatives to more traditional, energy-intensive chemical processes.
The industry is undergoing other significant changes as it seeks to address issues related to the lifecycle energy and resource impacts of manufactured goods. Many in the chemical industry are working to address these issues by improving the environmental sustainability of their own chemical processes, as well as by providing more sustainable products and technologies to others. As global competition to manufacture more sustainable products intensifies, industry, academia, and government partners need to leverage existing resources, collaborate across supply chains, and co-invest to nurture manufacturing innovation and accelerate commercialization of sustainable products and technologies. The market demand for more sustainable manufacturing practices in the chemical industry for both consumer and commercial products is a new opportunity to create significant value for U.S. manufacturing and maintain U.S. global competitiveness.
In recognition of the manufacturing industry’s evolving priorities, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) is investing in R&D to address sustainable chemistry in manufacturing. Over the last two decades, AMO has invested in R&D on a number of technologies that are vitally important to the U.S. chemical manufacturing industry—from tools for catalyst design to more efficient intensified processes to enabling technologies based on modeling and simulation. The Office has worked in partnership with the chemicals industry to develop a range of resources for improving energy efficiency and has extended those efforts to incorporate sustainability issues throughout the supply chain.
An overview of DOE AMO interest in sustainable chemistry in manufacturing processes was provided by Dr. G. Jeremy Leong, Technology Manager, R&D Projects. Technology innovation through applied R&D in
1 American Chemistry Council, 2019 Guide to the Business of Chemistry. 2 Ibid.
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advanced manufacturing and energy is a foundation for economic growth and jobs in the United States. The mission of AMO is to catalyze R&D and adoption of energy efficient advanced manufacturing technologies and practices to drive U.S. economic competitiveness and energy productivity. As part of its mission, AMO supports a range of projects addressing chemical industry energy challenges, through a three-pronged implementation approach including funding individual R&D projects, R&D consortia, and technical assistance (see Figure 3, below). The roundtable was cohosted with the Green Chemistry & Commerce Council (GC3). GC3 is an organization whose mission is to drive the commercial adoption of green chemistry by catalyzing and guiding action across all industries, sectors and supply chains. Their membership includes not only chemical producers but also companies using chemicals to make commercial products (e.g., shoe manufacturers) and companies selling commercial products (e.g., retail chains). All member companies are dedicated to advancing the 12 principles of green chemistry.
Figure 2. Three Pillars of the AMO Program
Roundtable Overview
Roundtable Purpose - Identify R&D needs for process technologies, materials, or products in order to incorporate sustainable chemistry manufacturing practices into the manufacturing processes of consumer and commercial products. On November 17, 2020, AMO partnered with the Green Chemistry & Commerce Council (GC3) to host a virtual roundtable on Sustainable Chemistry in Manufacturing Processes to collect industry stakeholders’ perspectives on future research priorities to incorporate sustainable chemistry manufacturing and practices into the manufacturing processes of consumer and commercial products. In attendance were 42 representatives from across the chemical manufacturing sector (shown in Figure 3). Attendees explored key opportunities for continued advances in sustainable chemistry, identified knowledge gaps, explored technology and commercialization barriers to sustainability, and determined the R&D needs to address those barriers and realize the opportunities. A variety of information sharing mechanisms were used to gather valuable input and feedback from participants. Before the roundtable, participants were invited to complete a questionnaire on the barriers to
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sustainable chemistry in manufacturing and the R&D needs to address. This information was used to inform the breakout sessions during the roundtable. The first half of the event included five-minute presentations from representatives of businesses throughout the sustainable chemistry manufacturing supply chain, from chemical industry suppliers to formulators and retailers. Presenters discussed their current sustainable practices and the barriers and needs for sustainable chemistry manufacturing. These presentations were punctuated by real-time meeting prompts to encourage engagement and learn about the sustainable manufacturing practices and viewpoints of each participant. Chemical industry association representatives were invited to provide their own perspectives after the mid-day break, with ensuing discussion. Throughout the day, participants were broken into smaller, parallel breakout group discussions to provide opportunities for deeper discussions. The agenda for the roundtable can be found in Appendix A, and Appendix B provides the full list of attendees. Also included in the Appendices are the summary of results from the pre-roundtable questionnaire (Appendix D) and a summary of real time meeting prompts conducted throughout the event (Appendix E) The acronyms used in this report are defined in Appendix C.
Figure 3. Participating stakeholders from the chemical sector.
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ChemistryProductsManufacturingManufacturing ProcessesEnergy