CHEMOTHERAPY AND PROSTATE CANCER-Taxol

Preparing to load PDF file. please wait...

0 of 0
100%
CHEMOTHERAPY AND PROSTATE CANCER-Taxol

Transcript Of CHEMOTHERAPY AND PROSTATE CANCER-Taxol

Chemotherapy and Prostate Cancer
The following information is based on the general experiences of many prostate cancer patients. Your experience may be different. If you have any questions about what prostate cancer treatment services are covered by your health insurance, please contact your health
care provider or health insurance provider.

This education material was made possible by a Grant from the California Department of Justice, Antitrust Law Section, from litigation settlement funds to benefit Californians diagnosed with cancer or their families.
2

Please feel free to read only those parts of the booklet you need now. You don’t need to read everything right now. You can always read more later.
Table of Contents
What Will I Learn By Reading This Booklet? ....................................... 4 What Is Chemotherapy?.......................................................................... 5 Why Would I Need Chemotherapy?....................................................... 6
Recurrence After Surgery ............................................................. 6 Recurrence After Radiation Therapy............................................ 6 Recurrence After Hormone Therapy ............................................ 7 How May Prostate Cancer Spread Through My Body? ......................... 8 Where Is My Prostate Cancer Likely To Spread In My Body?.............. 9 How You Might Feel If Your Prostate Cancer Returns ......................... 11 How Does Chemotherapy Work? ........................................................... 12 Will Chemotherapy Cure My Prostate Cancer? ..................................... 14 How Is Chemotherapy Given?................................................................ 14 Getting Chemotherapy Through An I.V....................................... 16 Getting Chemotherapy By Mouth Or Orally................................ 17 Can I Take Other Medicines While I Am Getting Chemotherapy? ....... 18 Are There Side Effects With Chemotherapy? ........................................ 20 How Will I Feel During My Chemotherapy? ......................................... 21 How Can I Help Myself During Chemotherapy? ................................... 24 Questions To Ask Your Doctor .............................................................. 26 Hints For Talking With Your Doctor...................................................... 27 What Have I Learned By Reading This Booklet? .................................. 28 Key Words .............................................................................................. 29
3

What Will I Learn By Reading This Booklet?
You and your doctor are talking about chemotherapy (key-mo-ther-a-pee) as a way to control your prostate cancer. To help you get ready for chemotherapy, it is important for you to learn as much about this kind of treatment as possible. It is also important to learn how to manage the side effects (unwanted changes in your body) you may have from chemotherapy. In this booklet you will learn:
• What chemotherapy is • Why you may need chemotherapy • How chemotherapy works • Ways to get chemotherapy • What to expect when you have chemotherapy It is important for you to learn how chemotherapy will affect your life during your treatment if you and your doctor decide that chemotherapy is the best way to manage your prostate cancer.
Words that appear in bold (dark text) can be found in the “Key Words” section at the end of this booklet.
4

What Is Chemotherapy?
When you have chemotherapy, you are given powerful anticancer medicines that kill many of your prostate cancer cells. Chemotherapy treats your whole body, not just one area, like surgery or radiation therapy. The chemotherapy medicines you are given travel throughout your whole body.
5

Why Would I Need Chemotherapy?
Prostate cancer can recur or come back after several months, a few years, or many years. It can recur after any treatment option you have chosen.
Recurrence after Surgery If you had surgery, you may ask how you can have prostate cancer if your prostate gland was taken out. This recurrence may have happened because some of the prostate cancer cells moved outside your prostate gland before it was taken out. These prostate cancer cells may not have been found because they were too small or there were not enough of them to be found. These prostate cancer cells then started to grow in the area where your prostate gland used to be or in another part of your body. When prostate cancer cells spread to other parts of the body it is called metastasis (muh-tas-tuh-siz).
Recurrence after Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy uses high-energy rays, such as x-rays, to kill cancer cells in your prostate. While the high-energy rays are focused on your cancer cells, they may not have killed all of the cancer cells in your prostate gland. If all of the prostate cancer cells are not killed, they can move outside your prostate gland and start growing nearby or in other parts of your body.
6

Recurrence with Hormone Therapy Hormone therapy shrinks your prostate cancer and kills many, but not all of your prostate cancer cells. Hormone therapy does not cure prostate cancer. It lowers the amount of testosterone in your body, which makes it harder for prostate cancer cells to grow. Testosterone is a hormone that makes you grow hair on your face and body, have a man’s body shape, and controls your desire for sex. After taking hormones to control your prostate cancer for a period of time, sometimes a number of years, your prostate cancer cells may change. This change lets them grow in your body even if you have no testosterone. When this happens it is called hormone refractory (ri-frak-tuh-ree) prostate cancer. This means that some of your prostate cancer cells may start to grow even though you are on hormone therapy.
7

How May Prostate Cancer Spread Through My Body?

Prostate cancer cells spread through your body in three ways:

1. Through your circulatory (sur-kyuh-luh-tohr-ee) system or

blood stream. When prostate cancer cells enter your blood

stream, they travel all over your body. The prostate cancer cells

come to rest in another part of your body where they can start to

grow.

2. Through your lymphatic (lim-fat-ik) or lymph system. Your

lymph system helps you fight infection and balance the amount of fluid in your body. There are many lymph nodes around

Your circulatory system

your prostate gland. The lymph nodes take a fluid called

lymph to different parts of your body. Prostate cancer cells

can enter your lymph system through your lymph nodes.

This lets your prostate cancer cells move to other parts of

your body where they can start to grow.

3. Your prostate cancer may move to the areas around your

prostate gland.

When prostate cancer cells start to grow in another part of your body, you have metastatic (met-uh-stat-ik) prostate cancer.

Your lymphatic system

8

Where Is My Prostate Cancer Likely To Spread In My Body?
Your prostate cancer may spread to several places in your body. The most common places your prostate cancer will spread are to your bones. The bones most often affected when prostate cancer spreads will be in your lower and upper back, hips, upper legs and ribs. If this happens you may have pain in those areas of your body. Remember, if you have pain, it can be controlled. Speak with your doctor or health care team if you have pain.

Another area where prostate cancer can spread is to the areas near your prostate gland, including the ureters (yoo-ri-ters), the tubes that carry urine from your kidneys to your bladder. If this happens, your kidneys may become blocked. The prostate cancer may also spread to the urethra (yoo-ree-thruh), the tube that carries urine from your bladder out through your penis. If this happens, you may have problems urinating (peeing).

Your urinary system

9

And, in very rare cases, it may spread to your liver. If this happens, you may find that you are not as hungry as usual. You may be more tired or weak. You may have pain in your stomach area. Your legs and feet may become swollen. And your body will not be able to handle alcoholic drinks. There are ways you can work with your doctor and health care team to take care of the problems you may have if your prostate cancer spreads to other areas of your body. The goal is to take care of your pain or any other problems you have so that you may continue doing your daily activities as well as you are able. If you have any problems, talk to your doctor or health care team.
10
BodyProstate CancerChemotherapyProstate Cancer CellsProstate Gland