Diversity Training Modules AUGUST 2005

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Diversity Training Modules AUGUST 2005

Transcript Of Diversity Training Modules AUGUST 2005

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Diversity Training Modules for Pre-Service Training

Diversity Training Modules for Pre-Service Training
Peace Corps Information Collection and Exchange
ICE No. T0129k
September 2005

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Acknowledgments
The Diversity Training Modules for Pre-Service Training evolved from diversity training materials that were originally written for the Peace Corps in 1992. Those materials were revised, condensed, and updated to create the current training modules. This kit provides clear and concrete strategies, resources, and session plans that support training on American diversity during pre-service training.
These modules were piloted at more than 15 training events including subregional conferences, all-staff trainings at post, and overseas staff training and as a part of a diversity training of trainers at headquarters. Feedback and suggestions were elicited and incorporated from programming and training officers, training managers, assistant Peace Corps directors, and Volunteers as well as from the offices of Diversity, Volunteer Recruitment and Selection, and the American Diversity program.
The Peace Corps expresses its gratitude to those who participated in the review and piloting of these modules.

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Table of Contents

Section Preface Preface Preface

Title
Diversity Training in the Peace Corps
Frequently Asked Questions
Trainer Preparation: Conducting Diversity Workshops

Page Topic
Goals, iii Approaches, and
Methods Goals, v Approaches, and Methods
vii Trainer Preparation

Time (in minutes) N/A
N/A
N/A

Preface

Sample Agendas xiv Workshop Design N/A

Introductions
Introductions
What is Diversity? What is Diversity?
What is Diversity?
Barriers to Understanding Barriers to Understanding Barriers to Understanding Building Understanding Building Understanding Building Understanding

Find Your Match 1

Counting

5

Differences

Definition

9

Lecturette

Personal Diversity 13 Mapping

Diversity and Three

Goals of the Peace 17

Corps

Stereotypes

21

Lecturette

Impact of

25

Conditioning

Perception Test

29

Labeling Activity 33

Fishbowl Exercise 41

Impact of Exclusion 47

Building

Reincarnation

51

Understanding

Icebreaker
Icebreaker
Defining Diversity Exploring Own Diversity
Practicality of Diversity
Stereotypes
Stereotypes
Perception
Stereotypes
Gender and/or Race In-Groups and Out-Groups Race, Gender, Sexual Orientation, Disability

15-30 20-30 30-45 45 30-45 30 15-20 20 60-75 60-75 45-60
30-45

Risk Level N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A Low Low Low Low Low
Low Low Low High Medium Medium Medium

Page i

Section Taking Action Taking Action Taking Action Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Appendix D

Title

Page Topic

Time (in minutes)

Responding to

57

Stereotypes

Case

Studies/Critical

63

Incidents

Action Planning and 75 Closing Circle

Diversity Trainer’s 79 Self-Assessment

Tips for Co-

Facilitating

81

Diversity

Workshops

Processing

Questions for

83

Diversity Activities

Diversity Resources 85 on the Web

How to Speak Up When You Hear Stereotypes

60-75

Next Steps

45-60

Next Steps
Workshop Delivery

20-40 N/A

Workshop

N/A

Delivery

Workshop

N/A

Delivery

Continued

N/A

Learning

Risk Level Medium Medium Low
N/A
N/A
N/A N/A

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Preface
Diversity Training in the Peace Corps
Goals and Key Questions
Note—Although diversity training is distinct from cross-cultural training, they do have some core concepts and methods in common. Diversity training in pre-service training focuses on understanding diverse groups within American society and how that diversity impacts Volunteer success and satisfaction. It increases understanding among diverse groups within the United States and helps Volunteers build respectful and effective relationships with each other, with Peace Corps staff, and with host country nationals (HCNs). In contrast, cross-cultural training may include information about the diversity within the local culture as well as information and skill building on topics such as culture shock, stress management and coping skills, and culture-general topics such as ways of thinking about and interpreting cultural differences.
The goals of diversity training conducted during pre-service training are to:
1. Develop an awareness and appreciation of the diversity within the training group and how interaction within the group may be positively or negatively impacted.
2. Develop strategies for Volunteer and trainee mutual support and how to be allies for each other.
3. Identify how interaction with the community and project effectiveness might be affected by Volunteer diversity and develop appropriate coping strategies.
4. Identify the appropriate process to raise allegations of discrimination or sexual harassment.
In sessions, encourage participants to think deeply about such key questions as:
• What is diversity and how is it manifested in our training group?
• How does the diversity of the people in this group impact our interactions and our perceptions of each other?
• How does diversity impact individuals, organizations, and societies in hidden ways?
• How could various types of American diversity impact our interactions and effectiveness with people in our communities?
• How can we support each other and be allies for those who want an ally?
• What can I personally do to help people in my community know more about and better accept all types of Americans?

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Approach and Methods
Diversity training is best when: • It is experiential and encourages participants to acknowledge their own cultural conditioning about people who are different from them. • It is co-facilitated by a pair (or team) whose diversity reflects that of the participants for the training. This allows the co-facilitators to model effective attitudes and behaviors. • It is facilitated by trainers who have previous experience in conducting diversity training; are skilled at handling emotions and potential conflicts brought up by the content of the training; and are well-versed in the history and current facts of diversity in the United States and in the Peace Corps. • It does not focus solely on awareness, but fosters awareness as a means to building the skills needed to effectively interact with others and to accomplish goals. • It is clearly linked to the issues Volunteers face at post—such as project success, program management, mutual support with other Volunteers, and effective interactions with HCNs. • It addresses both similarities and differences among people. An overemphasis either way can lead to either a minimization of the real impact of differences or to divisiveness and hopelessness. • It openly addresses issues of power and oppression and emphasizes responsibility for one’s own conduct and attitudes. • The agenda for each training is informed by data collected through the use of a needs assessment or diversity survey, and also includes core content and issues identified as essential to all such trainings.

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Frequently Asked Questions
Why were the diversity training modules developed?
Peace Corps Director Gaddi Vasquez and the current leadership of the Peace Corps are committed to increasing diversity of Volunteers so that they reflect “the face of America.”
Results of the all Volunteer survey and training status reports show that American diversity issues impact Volunteer satisfaction and effectiveness and point out the key support Volunteers can provide to each other throughout their service (if equipped to do so). Ensuring that all Volunteers have at least a basic level of knowledge and awareness of their diversity (and the diversity in their group) will impact the consistency of that support for Volunteers of different races, sexes, ages, religions, abilities, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Additionally, in some countries, Volunteers’ diversity may expose them to particular safety and security concerns. The Volunteer, staff, and other Volunteers all benefit from knowing how to support Volunteers in this circumstance. This subject can be integrated with safety and security competency #1 “Demonstrate an applied knowledge of a personal safety strategy—examine how Volunteer characteristics, such as race, age, sexual orientation, ability, religion, etc., should inform a Volunteer’s personal safety strategy.”1
My pre-service training is very full of other topics, how long will it take to cover American diversity?
The sessions within this kit are modular. Choose one or two sessions from each category and put together an agenda that is best tailored to your needs and circumstances. Sample agendas (page xiv) take as few as five hours to complete. Not all sessions need be delivered on the same day; they may be covered over a two- to three-week period.
How do I decide which sessions to use based on the diversity (or lack of it) among trainees?
The kit is designed to help the diversity of any group. It sets forth a method and vocabulary for discussing whatever diversity issue the participants bring up. It does not prescribe which aspects of diversity to address. It should be noted that there is always diversity within a group of trainees. Trainers should be aware of invisible diversity, such as religion, class, sexual orientation, and educational background. Also, trainers should consider gender as a key dimension of diversity and plan how to link diversity training with women in development (WID) and gender and development (GAD) training.

1 For a complete list of the pre-service training safety and security competencies, see the Intranet page: http://inside.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?viewDocument&document_id=3271.
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How were these sessions developed? Have they been piloted at posts?
These sessions have been in development since 2002. They started as revisions of previous materials written for and used by the Peace Corps. These previous materials included Shades [ICE No. R0104] and the American Cultural Diversity Training materials developed for the Peace Corps in 1992. These materials were updated, improved, and condensed to create current, flexible, and practical training sessions for pre-service training.
These materials have been piloted at more than 15 posts worldwide and used in at least nine subregional or post-specific training of trainers. In addition, this material was reviewed by representatives from Peace Corps offices such as Volunteer Recruitment and Selection, Placement, the regions, American Diversity programs, Communications, and the Center for Field Assistance and Applied Research. Feedback was elicited from those who piloted the materials and improvements were incorporated in this final version. Some comments from those who used the draft versions include:
• “Activities in the Diversity Training Modules are excellent tools for training.” (Zambia, TSR 2004)
• “The Diversity Training Modules have contributed to improved training in the areas of diversity issues.” (Belize, TSR 2004)
• “The materials in the Diversity Training Modules are very useful.” (Cote d’Iviore, 2003)
• “I thought your choices for exercises were excellent. I particularly liked the individual diversity mapping, the impact of exclusion exercise, and fishbowl exercises.” (Director of Diversity Recruitment, Peace Corps)

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