Farmer field schools for small-scale livestock producers

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Farmer field schools for small-scale livestock producers

Transcript Of Farmer field schools for small-scale livestock producers

ISSN 1810-0708

20
FAO ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND HEALTH
guidelines
FARMER FIELD SCHOOLS FOR SMALL-SCALE
LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS
A guide for decision makers on improving livelihoods

Cover photographs
Left: ©FAO/Giuseppe Bizzarri Centre: ©FAO/Giulio Napolitano Right: ©FAO/Solomon Nega

20
FAO ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND HEALTH
guidelines
FARMER FIELD SCHOOLS FOR SMALL-SCALE
LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS
A guide for decision makers on improving livelihoods
FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS Rome, 2018

Recommended citation FAO. 2018. Farmer field schools for small-scale livestock producers – A guide for decision makers on improving livelihoods. FAO Animal Production and Health Guidelines No. 20. Rome, FAO. 56 pp.
The designations employed and the presentation of material in this information product do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) concerning the legal or development status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. The mention of specific companies or products of manufacturers, whether or not these have been patented, does not imply that these have been endorsed or recommended by FAO in preference to others of a similar nature that are not mentioned. The views expressed in this information product are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of FAO. ISBN 978-92-5-130358-0 © FAO, 2018 FAO encourages the use, reproduction and dissemination of material in this information product. Except where otherwise indicated, material may be copied, downloaded and printed for private study, research and teaching purposes, or for use in non-commercial products or services, provided that appropriate acknowledgement of FAO as the source and copyright holder is given and that FAO’s endorsement of users’ views, products or services is not implied in any way. All requests for translation and adaptation rights, and for resale and other commercial use rights should be made via www.fao.org/contact-us/licence-request or addressed to [email protected] FAO information products are available on the FAO website (www.fao.org/publications) and can be purchased through [email protected]

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Contents

Foreword

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Acknowledgements

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Acronyms and abbreviations

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Glossary

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Introduction

1

What is a Livestock Farmer Field School?

5

Why Livestock Farmer Field Schools?

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Livestock-sector opportunities and challenges

7

The relevance of Livestock FFSs

7

FFS – a flexible approach for different small-scale livestock systems

8

Livestock FFSs in post-disaster and protracted emergency situations

10

Livestock FFS’s contribution to improving the livelihoods of the poor 11

What are the necessary conditions for successful Livestock FFS

implementation?

13

Implementing a Livestock FFS intervention

15

Livestock Farmer Field Schools

15

Project/programme phases and duration

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Frequently asked questions

22

Key lessons learned

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Success stories from the field

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Dairy FFSs in Burundi

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Livestock FFSs for pasture/fodder production in pastoral environments

in Kenya

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Poultry FFSs in Lebanon

31

FFS members in Pakistan become livestock trainers and local service

providers

33

The way forward

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References and further reading

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Multimedia

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Foreword
The livestock sector accounts for around one third of global agricultural gross domestic product (GDP) and is growing faster than most other agricultural sectors. Livestock’s expansion has mostly been driven by a combination of population growth, urbanization and rising incomes in many developing countries, which has raised demand for meat, milk and eggs. Consumption of livestock products is expected to further increase in the coming decades, offering opportunities for the development of the sector, poverty reduction and food security gains. However, the rapid pace of change could further marginalize smallscale producers. The risks to natural resources and human health must also be addressed to ensure sustainability.
The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) promotes and facilitates the sustainable development of the livestock sector through actions such as: facilitating the access of small-scale livestock producers, particularly in developing countries, to increasingly competitive markets for livestock commodities; contributing to safeguarding animal and veterinary public health; maintaining animal genetic diversity; and reducing the sector’s environmental impact. Within this framework, FAO has, over the past two decades, integrated livestock-focused Farmer Field Schools (FFSs) in several of its projects and programmes and has contributed to building the capacity of many development stakeholders (INGOs, NGOs, research institutes, etc.) on the FFS approach for the benefit of small-scale livestock producers across developing regions.
The FFS approach, originally developed with a focus on crops, has contributed to developing the critical analysis, decision-making and communication skills of small-scale livestock producers in many different contexts and environments, allowing them to build more efficient and sustainable systems. Livestock FFSs have been implemented/supported by FAO and many other development stakeholders, including the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), the World Bank, and numerous NGOs (VSF, Heifer International, etc.). Over the years, the approach has been applied to many different livestock production systems, including pastoralism and agro-pastoralism, dairying, poultry production, integrated rice-duck systems, rabbit production, pig production, beekeeping, beef production, camel production and small ruminant production. Today, FFSs are used for livestock development throughout developing regions, and interest in using the approach is growing among governments, NGOs, the private sector and other stakeholders.
In order to enhance the contribution of Livestock FFSs to improving the livelihoods of small-scale producers, and more broadly to the attainment of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, decision makers should be provided with information allowing them to better

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understand the approach’s potential. They should also be helped to appreciate how the FFS approach is applicable to different livestock production systems and conditions. This guide aims to fill these gaps and to serve as a complement to FAO’s Farmer Field School Guidance Document – Planning for quality programmes (FAO, 2016a).
Berhe G. Tekola Director
Animal Production and Health Division FAO

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Acknowledgements
The first draft of this document was prepared by the Animal Production and Genetics Branch (AGAG) of FAO’s Animal Production and Health Division (AGA). The draft was then revised, improved and finalized in February-March 2017 in a writeshop held in Machakos (Kenya), with the participation of experienced Crop and Livestock FFS practitioners. Overall coordination was provided by Giacomo de’ Besi, Livestock Development Specialist (AGAG).
We wish to thank all writeshop participants and all those involved in preparation of the document. Special thanks are due to Edwin Adenya (FAO Kenya), Gertrude Buyu (FFS Promotion Services), Deborah Duveskog (FAO Kenya), Marjon Fredrix (Plant Production and Protection division, FAO), Godrick Khisa (FFS Promotion Services), Kathiya Dominic Lokeris (FFS master trainer), Bruno Minjauw (FAO Lebanon), Titus Mutinda (FFS master trainer), Paul Mutungi (FAO Kenya), and Julie Ojango (ILRI).
Our thanks also go to the Livestock FFS practitioners who prepared the case studies: Tharcisse Sebushahu and Gertrude Buyu for Burundi, Bruno Minjauw for Lebanon, Paul Mutungi and Deborah Duveskog for Kenya, and Jam Muhammad Khalid and Shazia Jam for Pakistan.
We wish to acknowledge the several FAO officers who reviewed drafts of the document and provided valuable feedback: Roswitha Baumung, Badi Besbes, Malick Faye, Harinder Makkar, Friederike Mayen, Paul Opio, Olaf Thieme and Markos Tibbo. Useful input was also provided by Francis Anno, Wafaa El Khoury, Alfredo Impiglia, Akiko Kamata, Raffaele Mattioli, Winfred Nalyongo, Suzanne Phillips, Anne Sophie Poisot and Ibrahim Wora Salami.
We also acknowledge the valuable feedback and input received from the two peer reviewers: Katinka deBalogh and William Settle.
Finally, we acknowledge the support of Claudia Ciarlantini, Cristiana Giovannini, Enrico Masci and Ginevra Virgili for graphic design, Christopher Matthews for language editing and Antonella Falcone for administrative support.
FaoLivestock ProducersGuideDecision MakersLivelihoods