Food Allergy Training Guide for College and University Food

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Food Allergy Training Guide for College and University Food

Transcript Of Food Allergy Training Guide for College and University Food

Food Allergy Training Guide for College and University Food Services
The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network 11781 Lee Jackson Hwy., Suite 160 Fairfax, VA 22033 (800) 929-4040 www.foodallergy.org
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Produced and distributed by The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN). The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network is a nonprofit organization established to raise public awareness, to provide advocacy and education, and to advance research on behalf of all those affected by food allergies and anaphylaxis. All donations are tax deductible.
© 2005 The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network. ISBN No. 1-882541-41-3 All Rights Reserved. Adapted from Food Allergy Training Guide For Restaurants and Food Services, originally funded by the Food Allergy Initiative.
The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network grants permission for photocopying for limited internal use. This consent does not extend to other kinds of copying, such as copying for general distribution (excluding the materials in the Appendix, which may be customized, reproduced, and distributed for and by the establishment), for advertising or promotional purposes, for creating new collective works, or for resale. For information, contact The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network, 11781 Lee Jackson Hwy., Suite 160, Fairfax, VA 22033.
TO THE READER: This guide was designed to provide a guideline for college and university food service employees. The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network disclaim any responsibility for any adverse effects resulting from the information presented in this guide. The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network does not warrant or guarantee that following the procedures outlined in this guide will eliminate or prevent allergic reactions. The food service facility should not rely on the information contained herein as its sole source of information to prevent allergic reactions. The food service facility should make sure that it complies with all local, state, and federal requirements relating to the safe handling of food and other consumable items, in addition to following safe food handling procedures to prevent food contamination. The inclusion of brand name medications, medical devices, restaurants, or food products does not imply endorsement by The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network. Products, brands, and food service establishments shown are for illustrative purposes only and do not imply that they are in any way more or less dangerous, allergenic, or allergy-safe than competing brands or establishments.
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Acknowledgements
Funded by grant from: The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

This book would not be possible without the input and guidance of the following:

The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network’s Medical Advisory Board members:

S. Allan Bock, M.D.

Scott H. Sicherer, M.D.

A. Wesley Burks, M.D.

Steve Taylor, Ph.D.

Clifton T. Furukawa, M.D.

Robert A. Wood, M.D.

John M. James, M.D.

John W. Yunginger, M.D.

James P. Rosen, M.D.

Robert S. Zeiger, M.D., Ph.D.

Hugh A. Sampson, M.D.

The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network’s Restaurant Task Force members:

T.E. Tom Childers

Jack W. Mason

Manager, Food Safety & Supplier Quality

Director, Quality Assurance & Regulatory Affairs

Chick-fil-A

Triarc Restaurant Group

Frank Ferko

Arby’s, Inc.

Director of Quality Assurance & Product Safety Larry Scaglione

Brinker International

Director, Food Safety

Thomas M. Foegle

Carlson Restaurants Worldwide

Director of Food Safety & Regulatory Affairs

Nelson Taylor

Tricon Restaurants International

Quality Assurance Manager

Metromedia Restaurant Group

Linda W. Gilardi, R.S.

Corporate Food Safety & Compliance Manager

North American Division

Compass Group

In cooperation with:

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Special thanks to the following volunteers from members of The National Association of College & University Food Services for their editorial assistance.

Patrice Barber, RD Registered Dietitian University of Southern California
Ruth Blackburn, MPH, RD Nutrition Specialist University of Michigan
Greg Hopkins Director of Auxiliary Service Connecticut College
Jill Irvin, RD, LD Assistant Director Campus Dining Service The Ohio State University
Lisa Krausman, RD, LD Dining Unit Manager/ Administrative Dietitian University of Northern Iowa
Rich Neumann, MS, FMP Associate Director of Board Plan Operation Ohio University

Sue Pierson, RD Assistant Director Residential Dining Princeton University
Julia Salomon, MS, RD Registered Dietitian & Nutrition Education Syracuse University Food Services
Dianne Sutherland, RD, LD/N Dietitian Dining Services University of Massachusetts
Craig Traub Director of Food Services State University of New York - Oswego
Terry Waltersdorf Director of Campus Services Faith Baptist Bible College & Theological Seminary

The National Association of College & University Food Services (“NACUFS”) is a non-profit organization the primary purpose of which is to provide education and services to enhance the professionalism of college and university food services. The individuals listed above who provided editorial assistance to FAAN did so as volunteers. NACUFS does not provide any legal, medical or regulatory advice. NACUFS is not an author of the FAAN book Food Allergy Training Guide for College and University Food Services or accompanying materials, and does not assume any legal responsibility for an organization’s use or application of the FAAN book and accompanying materials, or any outcomes of such use or application. The FAAN book and materials provide a set of voluntary and nonbinding guidelines; see FAAN’s “To the Reader” note on page 2. The decision of an organization to use or apply any principles or practices provided in the FAAN book and materials is entirely voluntary and the responsibility of the organization that decides to do so.

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Food Allergy Training Guide for College and University Food Services
Table of Contents
Introduction ............................................................. 7 Overview of Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis .......... 13 Risk Management ................................................... 21 Policy Development ............................................... 23 The Manager .......................................................... 27 Front of the House .................................................. 31 Back of the House .................................................. 37 Handling an Allergic Emergency ........................... 45 Glossary of Allergy Terms ...................................... 47 Appendix ................................................................ 51 Other Sources of Information ................................. 63 References .............................................................. 65
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Introduction

Introduction
The following section provides direction for how to use this guide and what to consider when creating your food service’s food allergy policy.

Introduction
Scientists estimate that approximately 11 million Americans suffer from true food allergies. At the present time, there is no cure for food allergy. Avoidance is the only way to prevent an allergic reaction.
Food allergy-induced reactions are often unexpected and move swiftly throughout the body causing a range of symptoms that can include swelling of the lips, tongue, and throat; difficulty breathing; hives; abdominal cramps; vomiting; and diarrhea.
Potentially life-threatening allergic reactions, called anaphylaxis, may also include a drop in blood pressure and loss of consciousness. Food allergy-related reactions account for an estimated 30,000 emergency room visits and between 150 and 200 deaths each year.
When food-allergic individuals go to college, they must rely on food service staff to provide them with accurate information about ingredients so they can make an informed decision about what to order. Incorrect or incomplete information puts these individuals at risk for an allergic reaction.
Education, cooperation, and teamwork are the keys to safely serving a guest who has food allergy. All food service staff––from the front of the house staff to the back of the house staff to management staff–– must become familiar with the issues surrounding food allergies as well as the proper way to answer guests’ questions. Further, they must know what to do if an allergic reaction occurs.
Surveys of the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network (a national nonprofit organization) members indicate that a patient’s restricted diet influences the shopping and dining out habits of their entire family and many of their close friends. When these families find a product or a place to dine that they like and trust, they become loyal customers and encourage others to use these services, too. Therefore, while food allergy affects as many as 11 million Americans, its impact on college and university patronage affects a much larger number, in addition to the needs of serving the student several times a day.
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How to Use This Guide
This guide provides general information about food allergy and anaphylaxis, a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction. Several sections contain information for various staff members in a college and university food service establishment and strategies for handling situations they may face.
Some college and university food service establishments are quick service, while others include many levels of staff. Take the information presented here and adapt it to your establishment’s needs. Be sure to update information as menu items change, and make staff training and retraining a top priority.
Share appropriate sections, such as the Front of the House and the Back of the House sections, with your staff. Ask all employees to complete the quizzes at the end of each section to gauge their level of understanding about how an order placed by a diner who has a food allergy should be handled.
Use the reproducible handouts in the Appendix to educate your guests and to show them you care.
Finally, remember that you and the guest who has food allergies are both working toward the same goal––preventing an allergic reaction in your establishment.
Managing food allergies in a college and university food service establishment can be done. It requires a
partnership between the guest and the staff. Working together, you will prevent an allergic reaction.

Education, cooperation, and teamwork are the keys to safely serving a guest who has food allergy.

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Creating a Policy for Your Campus Dining Services
The best way to minimize risks to you and to your guests is to create a written procedure for handling food allergies for all staff members to follow. When creating your plan, consider the following:
♦ Who will answer the food-allergic diner’s questions regarding menu selection? (a manager, a dietitian, an administrator)
♦ Who will be responsible for checking the ingredients used? (the customer, the cook staff, a manager)
♦ What should the kitchen staff be aware of in order to avoid crosscontact?
♦ What should the staff do if an allergic reaction occurs? It only takes a few extra minutes to handle the special request or answer questions from a guest who has a food allergy. This is time well spent, as it may prevent an allergic reaction that could potentially cause serious health problems for an individual, requiring an ambulance arriving during peak time, or result in a lawsuit.
Get organized in advance
♦ Post emergency numbers at all telephones in the event emergency services are needed. Make sure the street address and telephone number for your food service establishment are posted, too. An example is provided in the Appendix.
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