Safety in Technology Education - Ministry of Education

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Safety in Technology Education - Ministry of Education

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Safety in Technology Education
A GUIDANCE MANUAL FOR NEW ZEALAND SCHOOLS
April 2017

SAFETY IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A GUIDANCE MANUALFOR NEW ZEALAND SCHOOLS
Published by the Ministry of Education, New Zealand April 2017. Mātauranga House Level 1 33 Bowen Street Wellington 6011 PO Box 1666, Thorndon Wellington 6140, New Zealand www.education.govt.nz
Crown copyright © 2017 Except for the Ministry of Education’s logo, this copyright work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand licence. In essence, you are free to copy, distribute and adapt the work, as long as you attribute the work to the Ministry of Education and abide by the other licence terms. In your attribution, use the wording ‘Ministry of Education’, not the Ministry of Education logo or the New Zealand Government logo. ISBN 978-0-478-16979-9 (Online)

SAFETY IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A GUIDANCE MANUALFOR NEW ZEALAND SCHOOLS
Contents
Introduction.............................................................................................................................................................3 Section 1 Legal requirements and responsibilities................................................................................5
1.1 Legislation affecting technology education...................................................................................................................................6 1.3 Other legislation, Regulations and Standards............................................................................................................................10 1.4 School policies and procedures........................................................................................................................................................ 12
Section 2 Responsibilities of Boards, Principals and Workers: Risk Management.............14
2.1 Boards of Trustees (PCBU).................................................................................................................................................................. 14 2.2 Principals/officers..................................................................................................................................................................................... 15 2.3 Teachers........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 16 2.4 Risk Identification, Assessment and Management..................................................................................................................17
Section 3 Responsibilities of teachers......................................................................................................22
3.2 Safety planning in technology education................................................................................................................................... 23
Section 4 Responsibilities of students.....................................................................................................24
4.1 Students (Others)..................................................................................................................................................................................... 24
Section 5 Safety in food technology.........................................................................................................26
5.1 Information for all teachers, including safety in non-specialist rooms......................................................................... 26 5.2 Additional safety in specialist areas............................................................................................................................................... 31
Section 6 Safety in biotechnology.............................................................................................................32
6.1 Information for all teachers, including safety in non-specialist rooms........................................................................ 32 6.2 Additional safety in specialist areas.............................................................................................................................................. 37
Section 7 Safety in electronics and control technology................................................................ 40
7.1 Information for all teachers, including safety in non-specialist rooms........................................................................ 40 7.2 Additional safety in specialist areas............................................................................................................................................... 42
Section 8 Safety in digital technology.................................................................................................... 44
8.1 Information for all teachers, including safety in non-specialist rooms........................................................................44 8.2 Safety online when using digital device to enable learning............................................................................................. 45 8.3 Classroom layout and design (physical environment)........................................................................................................48
Section 9 Safety in technology for resistant materials and textiles..........................................52
9.1 Information for all teachers, including safety in non-specialist rooms........................................................................ 52 9.2 Safety for resistant materials and equipment in specialist areas.................................................................................. 57 9.3 Safety in textiles specialist rooms..................................................................................................................................................68
Section 10 If an incident happens – guidelines for what to do ...................................................70
10.1 What events need to be notified in the Education Sector?.............................................................................................70
Section 11 School, tertiary, and ITO safety planning......................................................................... 75
11.1 Safety resources....................................................................................................................................................................................... 75

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SAFETY IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A GUIDANCE MANUALFOR NEW ZEALAND SCHOOLS
Appendices
Appendix 1 Template for safety planning in technology education..................................................................................... 76 Appendix 2 Completing the safety planning template – notes and examples............................................................... 83 Appendix 3 Protective devices for woodworking and abrasive machinery..................................................................... 91 Appendix 4 Micro-organisms suitable for use in schools.......................................................................................................... 92 Appendix 5 Recommended year levels for using machinery.................................................................................................. 93
Consultative group for 2016 update...................................................................................................... 94 Glossary...................................................................................................................................................................95

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SAFETY IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A GUIDANCE MANUALFOR NEW ZEALAND SCHOOLS
Introduction
Safety in Technology Education: A Guidance Manual for New Zealand Schools provides teachers, principals, and Boards of Trustees with the guidelines and information necessary to establish and implement sound health and safety policies and procedures for technology teaching and learning.

This guidance manual interprets and applies the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 and associated Amendments, as well as other relevant Acts and Regulations within the context of technology teaching in New Zealand schools. The manual also refers to other statements with which teachers and Boards of Trustees should be familiar, including the National Administration Guidelines 3 and 5.
The Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 with associated Amendments and guidelines also applies to students in Māori-Medium settings so this manual provides guidance for those students and teachers learning Hangarau through Te Marautanga o Aotearoa.

Continually reviewing safe practices is particularly important as new technologies become part of teaching and learning in technology education. To ensure the health and safety of their students and staff, the Person Conducting a Business or Undertaking (PCBU: Boards of Trustees as a legal entitiy) and Officers (individual board members including the principal) need to ensure that safety procedures and practices continue to be developed and implemented within their school, in keeping with the guidance presented in this manual and with any subsequent changes to Acts or regulations that cover health and safety in the workplace.

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SAFETY IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A GUIDANCE MANUALFOR NEW ZEALAND SCHOOLS

However, it should not be assumed that the warnings and precautions stated in this manual are all inclusive. In some situations, the PCBU, Officer and workers (paid employees including teachers and cleaners) need to use their professional judgment and seek additional information from health and safety professionals and relevant websites to prevent unsafe classroom practices occurring.
Safety in Technology Education is designed to assist classroom teachers and their students to take an active role in planning and implementing safe practices for the protection of everyone involved in technology education activities. Safe practices, as promoted by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) and Ministry of Education (MoE) should be viewed as an integral part of the planning for and delivery of technology education.
Teaching and learning programmes in technology integrate the three curriculum strands; Technological Practice, Technological Knowledge, and the Nature of Technology. Safety planning in technology needs to encompass all aspects of the teaching and learning programme.
The definition of safety adopted in this manual is wide, including aspects of physical, emotional, cultural, and environmental safety, as well as the safety of the end-users of the products or systems that result from technological practice.
Technology takes place within cultural settings. This aspect of safety should be addressed when planning student learning experiences in technology. This might include, for example, understanding local Māori protocols, such as whether it is acceptable for both genders to carry out traditional activities like carving or weaving. In one context, it may be acceptable for a whakapapa to be recorded in writing or for a picture of an ancestor to be used in a publication – in another situation, this may not be acceptable.

The key to planning for safety is identifying potential hazards and eliminating or minimising the risks so far as is reasonably practicable. Involving students in developing safety plans for units of work supports their understanding of working safely as a life-long skill. As teachers develop a unit of work in technology education, they should use this manual to develop a safety plan that identifies the hazards involved and the appropriate strategies to eliminate or minimise them. This safety plan should be an appendix to the unit of work and become part of its documentation. In this way, teachers revisiting the unit of work at a later date have the benefit of this planning and an opportunity to add to the safety plan.
The timing of learning about the safe use of equipment and safe working environments is crucial to effective student learning. Specific safety procedures learned when needed, at the time students are about to use the equipment or machinery ensures that students will be able to put the learning into practice immediately. They will then retain this pocket of knowledge and skills.
About this guide
The first two sections of this manual – Legal Requirements and Responsibilities, and Responsibilities of Boards of Trustees and Principals – set the expectations of the school leadership. The remaining sections:
»» focus on aspects that teachers and students need to consider when planning for and implementing safety practices in technology classrooms
»» document issues that teachers should be aware of when planning for and implementing safety in different areas of the technology curriculum
»» suggest approaches to take if an incident occurs
»» provide suggestions for when technology students are involved in out-of-school vocational or pathways activities.
Boards of Trustees, principals, and teachers should first read the general information in Sections 1 and 2. Teachers and students should then read sections relevant to specific learning contexts and, if necessary, refer to any applicable specialist information that is beyond the scope of this manual.

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SAFETY IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A GUIDANCE MANUALFOR NEW ZEALAND SCHOOLS
Section 1 Legal requirements and responsibilities
The legal requirements and responsibilities of schools for the safety of staff and students are covered by several pieces of legislation. These include the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 and its subsequent Amendments, the Health and Safety at Work (General Risk and Workplace Management) Regulations 2016, and the Health and Safety at Work (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 2016. The Acts of Parliament and their Regulations form the framework for safety planning in this area and must be complied with. http://www.education.govt.nz/ministry-of-education/specific-initiatives/health-andsafety/ gives guidelines on how legal requirements can be met in an educational setting. Some relevant Acts, Regulations, guidelines, and codes of practice are listed below.
Acts
Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 Food Act 2014
Regulations
Health and Safety at Work (General Risk and Workplace Management) Regulations 2016 Health and Safety at Work (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 2016
Guidelines and Codes of Practice
Health and Safety Practical Guide for Boards and School Leaders Code of Practice for School Exempt Laboratories Food Risk Management Framework (Ministry of Primary Industries) New Zealand School Trustees Association (NZSTA)

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SAFETY IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A GUIDANCE MANUALFOR NEW ZEALAND SCHOOLS

1.1 Legislation affecting technology education
Health and Safety at Work Act 2015
WorkSafe New Zealand (WorkSafe) is the work health and safety regulator, its functions include:
»» Monitoring and enforcing compliance with work health and safety legislation »» Providing guidance, advice and information on work health and safety »» Fostering a co-operative and consultative relationship between the people who have health and safety
duties and the persons to whom they owe those duties and their representatives. »» Collecting, analysing and publishing statistics and other information relating to work health and safety
The legislation recognises that a well-functioning health and safety system relies on participation, leadership, and accountability by government, business, and workers.
The purpose of the new Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 is to make clear everyone’s responsibilities in keeping workers healthy and safe in workplaces. The Act clarifies responsibilities and accountabilities, strengthens worker participation and creates expectations for effective risk management that are proportionate to the risk.
The legislation will be supported by government regulations, approved codes of practice (approved by the Minister) and guidelines (developed by the Regulator).
The Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 applies to schools in the same way it applies businesses and organisations. In the school setting, the PCBU is the Board of Trustees (as an entity) and has the primary duty of care, the principal is the Officer who has duty of due diligence, and the workers are any person who carries out work in any capacity for Boards of Trustees. Other persons include anybody within the school workplace and/or environment including students, parents, visitors, casual volunteers, members of the public.
Click link below to see table of roles: http://www.education.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Ministry/ Initiatives/Health-and-safety/HealthandSafetyinSchoolsroles.pdf

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SAFETY IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A GUIDANCE MANUALFOR NEW ZEALAND SCHOOLS

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Health and Safety in Schools
Duty holders and their responsibilities under the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015

Duty Holder
PCBU (Person conducting aBusiness or Undertaking)

Definition
The PCBU is usually a legal or corporate entity, including a selfemployed person. In a school this is the Board of Trustees. They have the primary duty of care for the health and safety of workers and others.

School Role
Board of Trustees (as an entity)

Responsibilities
The PCBU must ensure the health and safety at the workplace of: »» all workers »» other people, by ensuring they are not put at risk from work being
carried out. This means the PCBU must among other things: »» provide a safe and healthy environment for workers, including access
to facilities »» provide the right information and training to all workers »» provide and allow for worker participation in health and safety matters »» notify all serious illness, injury or near misses »» monitor workers’ health and workplace conditions to prevent illness or
injury

Officers Workers

Officers have significant influence over the management of the business or undertaking. They must exercise due diligence to ensure the PCBU meets its health and safety obligations.
Note: People who merely advise or make recommendations to an officer of the organisation are not officers.

Principals, individual members of the Board of Trustees

Workers work for the business or undertaking and can include: »» employees »» contractors or subcontractors and their workers »» labour hire company employees »» apprentices or trainees »» people on work experience or a work trial »» volunteer workers whose work is integral to the
business’ operations Note: Other volunteers, such as for fundraising, are not worker.

Teachers, non- teaching staff, the principal, contractors, volunteer workers, etc

Officers must take reasonable steps to: »» know about current work health and safety matters »» understand the hazards/risks associated with the workplace operations »» make sure there are resources and processes for managing risks »» ensure there are processes for receiving and reviewing information on
and responding to incidents, hazards and risks »» ensure workplace health and safety processes and resources are
being used.
Workers must: »» take reasonable care for their own health and safety »» take reasonable care that their behaviour does not adversely affect
the health and safety of others »» comply with any reasonable instruction from the PCBU to allow the
PCBU to comply with the Act »» cooperate with the PCBU’s health and safety policies or procedures Note: It is recommended workers should report any incident, risk or hazard to an officer or HSR, and inform visitors of any known hazards or risks in the workplace. Also, a student becomes a worker while on work experience for another PCBU. So when they are on work experience, the host PCBU will have the most influence over their health and safety.

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SAFETY IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A GUIDANCE MANUALFOR NEW ZEALAND SCHOOLS

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Duty Holder Health and safety representatives
Other persons

Definition
Health and safety representatives are workers who are elected to represent a defined workgroup.
A workgroup is a defined group of workers who are represented by one or more health and safety representatives. The workgroup may be defined by physical location, a business group or a group of workers who have common risks

School Role

Responsibilities
Health and safety representatives can: »» represent workers on health and safety matters »» investigate complaints from workers about health and safety issues »» monitor health and safety measures taken by the PCBU »» provide feedback to the PCBU about health and safety compliance »» issue provisional improvement notices and direct work group
members to cease unsafe work if appropriate.

Other persons include parents, visitors, other volunteers, general public and those who may be put at risk by the work of the PBCU. It does not include people who unlawfully enter the premises.

Visitors, parents/whānau, other volunteers etc

Other persons includes students

Students

Other persons should:
»» take reasonable care for their own health and safety
»» take reasonable care that their behaviour does not adversely affect the health and safety of others
»» comply with any reasonable instruction from the PCBU to allow the PCBU to comply with the Act.
The Health and Safety at Work Act does not specifically mention the age of responsibility for health and safety duties, however under the Crimes Act children under 10 can’t be prosecuted at all and children under 14 can only be prosecuted in special circumstances. One of the principles in the Children, Young Persons, and Their Families Act is that unless the public interest requires otherwise, criminal proceedings should not be brought against a child or young person if there is a way of dealing with the matter through alternative means (e.g. a warning or caution, or possibly through a school’s disciplinary processes). The likelihood of action against a schoolchild for a breach of health and safety duties is low.

This information is in accordance with the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 and is not a substitute for seeking legal advice. If you need advice on any aspect of your health and safety system, seek the assistance of a professional advisor.

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SafetyHealthTechnology EducationTeachersWorkers