SCQF - Education Scotland Education Scotland

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SCQF - Education Scotland Education Scotland

Transcript Of SCQF - Education Scotland Education Scotland

© Crown copyright 2010

Contents
Introduction
How to use the ESOL initial assessment material ........................................ 2 How to conduct the assessment..................................................................... 7
One-to-one assessment ................................................................................ 8 Group assessment ....................................................................................... 10 ESOL literacy learners ................................................................................... 13 Learner placement ......................................................................................... 14 Jagged profiles............................................................................................. 15 Informing the learner of the outcome ........................................................... 16
Assessing the learner
Section 1: Assessing speaking and listening.............................................. 17 Procedures................................................................................................... 17 Materials and assessment guide.................................................................. 17 Learner information form .............................................................................. 18 Learner information form ............................................................................. 23
Section 2: Assessing reading ....................................................................... 27 Procedures................................................................................................... 27 Tasks ........................................................................................................... 29 Answers ....................................................................................................... 37
Section 3: Assessing writing......................................................................... 39 Procedures................................................................................................... 39 Tasks ........................................................................................................... 40 Assessment guide........................................................................................ 43
Section 4: Assessing literacy........................................................................ 44 Procedures................................................................................................... 44 Materials ...................................................................................................... 44
Appendices
Appendix 1: SCQF Framework and Levels Equivalents ............................. 50 Appendix 2: Speaking and listening exemplars (including videos)........... 52 Appendix 3: Writing exemplars..................................................................... 59 Appendix 4: Information relating to initial assessment and applications for naturalisation and settlement ........................................... 87
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ESOL Initial Assessment: introduction
This guide was produced by the Scottish Government’s Lifelong Learning Directorate in 2010 to support practitioners to undertake initial assessment with their learners. Its aim is to help standardise initial assessment approaches, so that the learner can be placed in the appropriate provision.
It is recommended that providers adopt the principles, approaches and ESOL levels within the guide, and adopt or adapt the assessment materials to suit initial assessment procedures within their organisation. This revised edition takes account of the changes to SQA1 qualifications.
These materials are designed to be used in a wide variety of contexts and settings to assess learners from ESOL literacies beginners to entry to vocational and academic programmes of learning/courses. They can be used by providers across all sectors including colleges, community, voluntary organisations and schools.
The guidance and materials in this pack are based on the principle that the main purpose of initial assessment is to ensure that all ESOL learners are placed in the most appropriate learning opportunity in order to make progress towards their specific language learning objectives and to achieve their personal, educational or employment goals. Initial assessment is the first stage in a process of diagnostic assessment and the development of an Individual Learning Plan (ILP).
This guide contains materials to assess all four skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Speaking and listening are assessed through a learner interview, which also plays a vital role in gathering information about the learner’s past experience and in establishing their aims and aspirations for the future.
This guide uses the table (Appendix 1 (page 50)) to relate the outcome of the initial assessment process to SCQF2 levels.
The levels for each skill are matched against the SCQF and SQA NQ ESOL levels, both of which are derived from the Common European Framework (CEF).3 There are exemplars of the interview, the assessment of speaking and
1 Scottish Qualifications Authority http://www.sqa.org.uk/ 2 Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF) http://www.scqf.org.uk/ 3 The Common European Framework http://www.coe.int/t/dg4/linguistic/CADRE_EN.asp
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ESOL Initial Assessment: introduction
listening, and of learners’ writing to support standardisation. Detailed commentaries accompany the exemplars and are matched to the assessment criteria used. Grammar is assessed through the tasks completed by the learner in the productive skills of speaking and writing and reference is made to the range of structures used and accuracy of production in the accompanying exemplars (Appendix 2 (page 52) and 3 (page 59)). The assessment can be used with individual learners or with groups, and detailed information on how to conduct the assessment in different scenarios is given to support the process. ESOL learners with dyslexia4 It is also worth considering the possibility that some ESOL learners may have a specific learning difficulty such as dyslexia. Assessors should be aware of the common characteristics of adult dyslexia and discuss learning preferences with the learner at the outcome stage of their assessment. This should be recorded on the Learner Information Form.
4 http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Education/Life-LongLearning/17551/practice/learningdifficulties/dyslexiacharacteristics
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ESOL Initial Assessment: introduction
What is effective practice in initial assessment?
The following examples of effective practice have been incorporated into this guide:
Responsibilities of the organisation and the ESOL tutor/teacher
• Learners should always be assessed by a qualified and experienced ESOL tutor/teacher.
• ESOL staff must be familiar with the materials, criteria and levels used and should use the exemplars to standardise.
• Staff new to the organisation should always have the opportunity to observe an experienced ESOL tutor carrying out initial assessment.
• Staff carrying out initial assessment should match the learner to the appropriate learning opportunity and consider future progression routes.
• As well as gathering information on the level of the learners’ skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, the tutor/teacher should be taking account of levels of confidence, attitudes to learning and preferred learning styles. These factors will inform decisions about the most appropriate learning opportunity.
• Staff should also be sensitive to any key cultural, social or religious concerns that learners may have about particular learning programmes/courses.
Conducting the initial assessment
• Staff need to be aware that learners may be very nervous and that this may be their first contact with the Scottish education system or, indeed any form of organised learning.
• In all organisations, a key part of the process is an interview and this must be set up to put learners at ease and to build confidence in their abilities.
• It is essential that the tutor/teacher gives a clear explanation of the purpose and process so the learner understands why questions are being asked.
• The tutor/teacher should create an environment which puts the learners at ease. Translators and interpreters should be used as necessary.
• Listening, speaking, reading and writing should be assessed to establish a level in each skill.
• Learners should be given feedback on the initial assessment in a way that builds their confidence and they should be clear about what the next steps will be.
• There should always be an opportunity for the learner to ask questions about the learning opportunities available and the tutor/teacher should provide clear information about any alternatives.
• Learners should leave the initial assessment with a document that clearly indicates when and where they were assessed, their level and recommended learning opportunities.
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ESOL Initial Assessment: introduction
After the initial assessment • Further diagnostic assessment should take place when the learner joins a
learning programme to ensure that they are on the right course. If the learner is not on the most suitable course, arrangements should be made to transfer him/her, ensuring that any ILP goes with the learner. • The information gathered during the initial assessment process should always be given to the tutor/teacher who will be tutoring/teaching the learner to begin the process of building an ILP.
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ESOL Initial Assessment: how to use the guide
In this initial assessment, all four skills - speaking, listening, reading and writing - are assessed. Speaking and listening are assessed through a short interview with the learner and a judgement is made about level using criteria provided. This part of the assessment has two aims: • to assess the level of the learner’s speaking and listening skills • to begin to build up a profile of the learner’s needs and goals. This is just the start of the process of building a profile which will continue when the learner has been placed in a suitable learning programme/course. Reading is assessed through a series of texts that gradually increase in difficulty. There is an easy to use guide on how to mark these and match to level. Writing is assessed though a short written task and a judgement is made about level, again using criteria provided. The assessor may wish to talk about the subject of the written task with the learner beforehand, which in turn could help generate ideas for the learner to use in his/her writing. This will eliminate the worry of “what can I write?” and allow the learner to focus on “how can I write about this topic?”
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ESOL Initial Assessment: how to use the guide How to conduct the assessment
The materials in this guide are designed to be used by a qualified6 ESOL tutor/teacher so, whether the assessment is conducted on a one-to-one basis or with groups of learners, it is essential that your organisation complies with this requirement. In order to make potential learners feel welcome and as relaxed as possible, you may want to consider some of the following factors: • display welcome signs in different languages (see example below) • make the location of the assessment as comfortable as possible • organise a waiting area with refreshments and information for learners • organise the layout for the interview so that it does not feel too formal for
the learner. • provide a toy box for any children that accompany their parents to the
assessment.
6 Qualified to SCQF Level 8/9 in teaching ESOL
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ESOL Initial Assessment: how to use the guide
One-to-one assessment
Before you start the assessment, you should explain the procedure and the aim of the assessment to the learner. Make it clear that this is not a test or exam, but a means to discover their level of English, their learning needs and their goals, in order to find the most appropriate learning opportunity for them.
It is recommended that you begin the process with the speaking and listening stage to put the learner at ease and also to help you, the interviewer, determine which reading and writing tasks to give the learner.
You should carry out the speaking and listening assessment in a relaxed and informal manner to help the learner feel comfortable and secure (see the section on speaking and listening for more detail (page 17)). Once this is completed, you should assess the skills of the learner according to the criteria (see pages 20 - 22). When you have made a decision about the level you should mark it on the learner information form.
The next stage of the process is to assess reading skills. You can ask the learner to start from the beginning of the texts and work through in order. However, where possible, if you are more confident about level, you can ask the learner to start at a particular text. The learner should complete as many of the texts as appropriate. See the section on reading for more detail (page 27).
The final stage of assessment is the writing task. You should decide which task to give the learner based on the results of the speaking and listening assessment and the reading assessment. Give the learner a time limit of twenty minutes to complete the task. See the section on writing for more detail (page 39).
Record the results of the assessment on the learner information form. Once done, you should be able to recommend an appropriate learning opportunity and level for the learner. See the section on learner placement (page 14) for more information.
Finally, you should check that the learner does not have any more questions and clearly understands the outcome of the process. Then you give the learner a copy of the shorter version of the learner information form.
Please see diagram on the following page.
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AssessmentLearnerLevelProcessLearners