Section Iv Types Of Pensions

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Section Iv Types Of Pensions

Transcript Of Section Iv Types Of Pensions

SECTION IV – TYPES OF PENSIONS
A. Unreduced Pensions B. Reduced Pensions C. Disability Pensions D. Deferred Vested Pensions E. When Your Pension Begins F. If You Continue to Work After Age 70½

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SECTION IV TYPES OF PENSIONS
There are three types of pensions currently available under the Plan: unreduced (full pension), reduced and disability.

SECTION IV. A UNREDUCED PENSIONS

WHEN YOU’RE AGE 65 OR OLDER
You may be eligible to retire and receive an unreduced normal retirement pension when you reach “Normal” retirement age, which is age 65, if you are Vested (see page 19).

WHEN YOU’RE AT LEAST AGE 62 BUT NOT YET AGE 65
If you retire on or after July 1, 1998, you may be eligible to receive an unreduced early retirement pension if you’re working in Covered Employment when you reach age 62 and you have 20 years of Credited or Vesting Service. If your last Hour of Credited or Vesting Service was from June 15, 1995, through June 30, 1998, 25 years of Credited or Vesting Service are required to receive an unreduced early retirement pension.

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SECTION IV. B REDUCED PENSIONS

You may be eligible to Retire and receive a reduced early retirement pension if you’re at least 55 years old (but not yet 65) and you are Vested (as described on page 19). An early retirement pension is calculated in the same way as a normal pension – based on your Credited Service, pay and the benefit rate in effect when Covered Employment ends – except your pension payment is reduced because your pension is starting earlier and is expected to be paid for a longer period of time. Your normal retirement benefit will be reduced 6% for each full year (or, 0.5% for each month) by which your actual Retirement date precedes your Normal Retirement date.
For example, suppose you decide to Retire the month you turn age 60. If you had waited until age 65, your normal retirement pension would be $500/month. Since you will not be 65 for five years, your pension is reduced by 30%, that is, by 6% for each of the five years you are under age 65. Your early retirement pension is $350/month, or $150 lower than your normal retirement pension would have been.

WHEN YOU’RE NOT YET AGE 65
If you Retire early, but want to receive an unreduced monthly pension payment, you can wait to start receiving your pension until you’re 65. Then, there would be no reduction in your pension. However, deferring your pension may also affect your eligibility for retiree health benefits and may not be the best option for you. Before making this choice, contact the Pension Fund Office and talk to a Pension Fund counselor (see pages 3-4.) If you don’t have enough service to qualify for an unreduced early retirement pension as described above, you can begin to receive a reduced early retirement pension, as described above.
Once you start receiving a pension, the amount of time that you can work in related employment may be limited. See page 34 for more information.

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SECTION IV. C DISABILITY PENSIONS

You may qualify for a disability pension benefit if you meet all of the following requirements:
• You have a Total and Permanent Disability, confirmed by your approval for Social Security Disability benefits from the Social Security Administration, and you continue to be eligible for these benefits;
• You were Vested when the Total and Permanent Disability occurred;
• The condition or event giving rise to your Total and Permanent Disability occurred on or before your last day working in a covered job category, and
• Your Covered Employment terminated as a result of that condition or event
• Your Disability Pension Benefit will be paid in an amount equal to the Straight Life Option without a survivor option. See page 64 for an explanation of pension options.
A Disability Pension Benefit is not automatic. You must apply for this benefit with the Pension Fund. For more information, call the Pension Fund.
Your Disability Pension Benefit will usually start on the effective date of your Social Security Disability payments. However, if you don’t apply for a Disability Pension then you may

apply later and still be eligible to receive retroactive Benefits for up to two years before you filed your application for Disability Pension Benefits with the Pension Fund Office. Note, however, that you cannot receive more than two years of retroactive Disability Pension Benefits – no matter how many years elapse between the effective date of your Social Security Disability payments and the date you file your application for the Disability Pension Benefit with the Fund Office. If you are receiving weekly disability benefits from the 1199SEIU National Benefit Fund, your Disability Pension Benefit through the Pension Fund will not begin until after those benefits from the National Benefit Fund run out.
IF YOU NEED PENSION BENEFITS BEFORE YOUR DISABILITY PENSION BEGINS
If you are eligible, you may apply for an Early Retirement Pension to be paid while you are waiting for approval of your Social Security disability benefit. When you are approved for the Social Security disability benefit, your early retirement pension will be converted to a Disability Pension Benefit as of the effective date of social security disability. The two-year limit on retroactivity described above applies.

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If you obtained your Spouse’s approval for another option and/or Beneficiary for your early retirement pension, the approval becomes void once your pension is converted to a Disability Pension Benefit. This means, for example, that if at the time you applied for your disability benefit from the Fund, you also elected and started receiving an early retirement benefit under a Joint and 50% Survivor Pension with your Spouse as Beneficiary, this pension will automatically convert to a disability pension – which pays you a higher monthly amount but offers no survivor benefit – effective on the first day of the month in which your Social Security disability benefit begins. This means that your spouse will not receive pension benefits on your behalf after your death, except if before your death you later are no longer disabled and are still eligible for an early retirement pension.
WHEN YOU REACH 65, YOU MUST APPLY FOR A “NORMAL RETIREMENT PENSION”
You will continue to receive the disability pension benefit up until age 65, as long as you continue to qualify for Social Security disability payments. About three to six months before you turn 65, you should call a Pension Fund counselor to apply for a normal retirement pension.

Please note that the conversion to a normal retirement benefit will not happen automatically. You will have to complete a pension application form for the normal retirement pension, including obtaining spousal consent, if applicable. If your Social Security disability pension is discontinued or ends before age 65, you will no longer be eligible for disability pension benefits. If that happens, you should call a Pension Fund counselor to see if you may be eligible for a different kind of pension, such as an early retirement pension.
NOTE: If you have applied for and are eligible for weekly disability benefits from the 1199SEIU National Benefit Fund, you may not receive normal, early or disability retirement pension payments until the first of the month following the expiration date of that benefit.
You must apply promptly for a disability pension. Retroactive payments cannot be made for any period more than two years before the date you file your disability pension application with the Fund Office.

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SECTION IV.D DEFERRED VESTED PENSIONS

IF YOU LEAVE COVERED EMPLOYMENT AFTER YOU’RE VESTED BUT BEFORE YOU’RE ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE
You may be entitled to a Deferred Vested pension even if you do not qualify for a normal or an early pension. Generally, if you leave Covered Employment for any reason after you become Vested but before you’re eligible to Retire under the terms of the Plan, you will be entitled to a Vested pension when you become eligible to Retire.

HOW A DEFERRED VESTED PENSION IS CALCULATED
A Deferred Vested pension is calculated in the same way as a normal pension, based on your Credited Service, pay and the benefit rate in effect when your Covered Employment ends.

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SECTION IV. E WHEN YOUR PENSION BEGINS

Pension payments start on the first of the month after you do all of the following:
• Meet the requirements for one of the pensions offered by the Plan
• Retire (that is, completely withdraw from employment with a Contributing Employer)
• File a completed, valid application with the Fund Office on which you have selected the date your pension is to begin, together with information that is required in order to establish and/or maintain your eligibility for a pension and other information that the Retirement Committee of the Trustees may, in its discretion, require.
Note that if you are receiving weekly disability benefits from the 1199SEIU National Benefit Fund, you will not be considered Retired until those payments end.

If you continue working for a Contributing Employer after your 65th birthday, the Plan will not make any pension payments until you officially Retire or until April 1 of the year following the year you reach age 70-1/2, whichever happens first. At that time, your pension will be based on your salary and Credited Service up to that point. Your pension benefit will only be adjusted to include the pay and Credited Service you earned between age 65 and when you stop working and begin collecting your pension. There will be no additional adjustment for delaying collecting your benefit until after age 65. If you have not Retired by age 70-1/2, your pension payments will automatically begin on April 1 of the following year.

SECTION IV. F IF YOU CONTINUE TO WORK AFTER AGE 70 1/2

If you are Vested, you will automatically start receiving pension payments in April of the year after the year in which you reach age 70½. Your payments will be based on your salary and service up to that point.
Then, your pension benefit is adjusted each year you continue working in Covered Employment after age 70½. This way, your pension will include your additional Credited Service and your pension benefit may be higher.
If you have not applied for a pension or the Fund has not accepted your pension application when your pension payments must begin by law, your pension will be paid according to the Joint and 50% Survivor option, if you received Credited Future Service on or after August 23, 1984.

When your pension application is accepted by the Fund Office, your pension payment may be adjusted if the original calculation paid to you was too much or too little. If you were paid too little, your future payments will be adjusted to make up for the amount due you. If you were paid too much, your future payments will be decreased, in an amount established by the Retirement Committee, until the Fund has been reimbursed. After the Fund has been reimbursed, your pension payment will no longer be reduced.
If you are ready to Retire before age 70½, you must apply for your pension for payments to begin (see page 71 for more information).

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PensionRetirement PensionServiceDisability Pension BenefitEmployment