Special Education Handbook - School of Education

Preparing to load PDF file. please wait...

0 of 0
100%
Special Education Handbook - School of Education

Transcript Of Special Education Handbook - School of Education

School of Education
Preliminary EDUCATION SPECIALIST CREDENTIAL PROGRAM Mild/Moderate/Severe Disabilities
RESOURCE HANDBOOK
2020-2021
For Student Teachers, Mentor Teachers, Supervisors & School Administrators
Updated 7/11/19
0

SPECIAL EDUCATIONPROGRAM

Revised

CREDENTIAL CANDIDATE, MENTOR TEACHER, AND SUPERVISOR SIGNATURE REQUIRED:

I understand that the Special Education Handbook provides information on the program as well as the rights and responsibilities of credential candidates, mentor teachers, and supervisors. I acknowledge that I have read the handbook which details professional and ethical conduct for credential candidates as well as information for the resolution of problems related to professional conduct.

Check one:

[ ] CREDENTIAL CANDIDATE

[ ] MENTOR TEACHER

[ ] SUPERVISOR

Print Name

Signature and Date

Please submit a signed copy of this page no later than two weeks after the beginning of the semester to the Office of Education and Credentialing, HGH, Room 202. Thank you.

1

WELCOME STUDENTS
Welcome to the Education Specialist Credential Program at Humboldt State University! We want to take this opportunity to congratulate you on your acceptance into the special education program, a program that selects only a few outstanding students as candidates each academic year.
Students often ask, “What will the year be like?” Briefly, the coursework is interesting, rigorous, and grounded in research-based practice. The faculty will work individually, in the role of a mentor, with you to answer questions about specific curriculum content and instruction. You will spend a considerable amount of time in a special education classroom observing, and working alongside local teachers. As is the case of students selected into the program, our mentor teachers and university supervisors are a very select and experienced group of professionals.
Our goal is to offer you an excellent teacher preparation experience with a focus on collaboration. This focus serves to unite the components of the program together. We believe strongly that teacher preparation is a shared responsibility and you, as a credential candidate, will need to extend an effort equal to that of your teachers and mentors to gain the most from the experience.
We are very pleased that you have decided to be part of the special education credential program, and we are committed to making this a successful and rewarding experience for you.

David A. Ellerd, PhD Program Leader 707-826-5851 [email protected]

Bernie Levy Program Coordinator
707-826-5795 [email protected]

2

Special Education Credential Program
TABLE OF CONTENTS SPECIAL EDUCATION HANDBOOK
Preliminary Education Specialist
For Student Teachers, Mentor Teachers, Supervisors and School Administrators
Page Code of Ethics....................................................................................................................6
Commitment to the Student · Commitment to the Profession
Mission Statement .............................................................................................................8 Philosophical Orientation · Educational Goals
Program Completion Requirements & Special Education Course Requirements ..................9 Mild/Moderate Course Requirements · Course Units · Coursework Descriptions
Special Education Course Requirements ........................................................................... 13 Moderate/Severe Course Requirements · Course Units · Coursework Descriptions
CREDENTIAL CANDIDATE What are a Credential Candidate’s Legal Rights and Responsibilities?
Policies and Procedures .....................................................................................................17 What is the SPED attendance Policy · What is the purpose of student teaching · At what point may a student teacher take over the class · What is the formal assessment procedure · When may a student teacher be placed on contract and what is the procedure · What are the procedures for resolving fieldwork or supervision problems · Is insurance required of the candidate · How does the SPED program meet the Standard for language instruction in English
Mild to Moderate Support Needs Teaching Performance Expectations Comparison Chart………………………………………………………………………………………22
Frequently Asked Questions for Student Teaching............................................................34
The Role of the Student Teacher .......................................................................................35 To whom am I directly responsible · What can I expect the Mentor Teacher to allow/require me to do in the first week(s) of the assignment · How long do I observe lessons before I can begin teaching
Unit and lesson plans and Procedures................................................................................36 What is the weekly plan · How do I write daily lesson plans · In what form are my plans made, organized and located · What procedure will the Mentor Teacher follow when my plans are poorly done or not ready in advance · When/how will I be allowed to shorten my lesson plans
3

Lesson Plan to Accommodate Individual Special Needs...................................................37 Set · Inform · Materials · Teacher-Directed Lesson · Review · Generalization
Advice from Former Students ...........................................................................................39 MENTOR TEACHERS Mentor Teacher Responsibilities to the Student Teacher ..................................................40
What are the SPED requirements of all mentor teachers · What are the mentor teacher’s responsibilities to the student teacher Feedback and Evaluation...................................................................................................42 How will my Mentor Teacher review my progress and evaluate my achievement throughout my student teaching assignment UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR The Role of the University Supervisor ..............................................................................43 What will the University Supervisor be “looking for” during an observation/visit · What can I do to avoid being nervous or apprehensive about being observed or evaluated · Should I schedule regular conferences with the University Supervisor What do Supervisors Look for in the Classroom?.............................................................44 What is the Process of Clinical Supervision? ....................................................................45 Supervisor Guidelines & Observations .............................................................................46 The beginning of the class period · The lesson · Student characteristics · Management and discipline. Supervisor Timeline ..........................................................................................................48 Suggested timeline · Additional timeline notes
APPENDIX—FORMS
Special Education Student Teacher Activity Guidelines
Interim Professional Development Checklist
Unit and Lesson Plan Template
SPED 734/735/748 Fieldwork Assessment
Confidential Request for Change in Student Teaching
Placement
Request to Substitute Teach
Certificate of Eligibility
California State University Risk Management Authority
*To access these forms on our website click here.
4

COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Special Education Professional Ethical Principles
Professional special educators are guided by the CEC professional ethical principles, practice standards, and professional policies in ways that respect the diverse characteristics and needs of individuals with exceptionalities and their families. They are committed to upholding and advancing the following principles: 1. Maintaining challenging expectations for individuals with exceptionalities to develop the
highest possible learning outcomes and quality of life potential in ways that respect their dignity, culture, language, and background. 2. Maintaining a high level of professional competence and integrity and exercising professional judgment to benefit individuals with exceptionalities and their families. 3. Promoting meaningful and inclusive participation of individuals with exceptionalities in their schools and communities. 4. Practicing collegially with others who are providing services to individuals with exceptionalities. 5. Developing relationships with families based on mutual respect and actively involving families and individuals with exceptionalities in educational decision making. 6. Using evidence, instructional data, research, and professional knowledge to inform practice. 7. Protecting and supporting the physical and psychological safety of individuals with exceptionalities. 8. Neither engaging in nor tolerating any practice that harms individuals with exceptionalities. 9. Practicing within the professional ethics, standards, and policies of CEC; upholding laws, regulations, and policies that influence professional practice; and advocating improvements in the laws, regulations, and policies. 10. Advocating for professional conditions and resources that will improve learning outcomes of individuals with exceptionalities. 11. Engaging in the improvement of the profession through active participation in professional organizations. 12. Participating in the growth and dissemination of professional knowledge and skills. Approved, January 2010
5

Preamble

Code of Ethics of the Education Profession

The National Education Association believes that the education profession consists of one education workforce serving the needs of all students and that the term ‘educator’ includes education support professionals.

The educator, believing in the worth and dignity of each human being, recognizes the supreme importance of the pursuit of truth, devotion to excellence, and the nurture of democratic principles. Essential to these goals is the protection of freedom to learn and to teach and the guarantee of equal educational opportunity for all. The educator accepts the responsibility to adhere to the highest ethical standards.

The educator recognizes the magnitude of the responsibility inherent in the teaching process. The desire for the respect and confidence of one’s colleagues, of students, of parents, and of the members of the community provides the incentive to attain and maintain the highest possible degree of ethical conduct. The Code of Ethics of the Education Profession indicates the aspiration of all educators and provides standards by which to judge conduct.

The remedies specified by the NEA and/or its affiliates for the violation of any provision of this Code shall be exclusive and no such provision shall be enforceable in any form other than one specifically designated by the NEA or its affiliates.

Principle I
Commitment to the Student The educator strives to help each student realize his or her potential as a worthy and effective member of society. The educator therefore works to stimulate the spirit of inquiry, the acquisition of knowledge and understanding, and the thoughtful formulation of worthy goals.
In fulfillment of the obligation to the student, the educator—
1. Shall not unreasonably restrain the student from independent action in the pursuit of learning.
2. Shall not unreasonably deny the student access to varying points of view. 3. Shall not deliberately suppress or distort subject matter relevant to the student’s progress. 4. Shall make reasonable effort to protect the student from conditions harmful to learning or
to health and safety. 5. Shall not intentionally expose the student to embarrassment or disparagement. 6. Shall not on the basis of race, color, creed, sex, national origin, marital status, political or
religious beliefs, family, social or cultural background, or sexual orientation, unfairly— a. Exclude any student from participation in any program; b. Deny benefits to any student; c. Grant any advantage to any student. 7. Shall not use professional relation- ships with students for private advantage. 8. Shall not disclose information about students obtained in the course of professional service
unless disclosure serves a compelling professional purpose or is required by law.
6

Principle II Commitment to the Profession The education profession is vested by the public with a trust and responsibility requiring the highest ideals of professional service. In the belief that the quality of the services of the education profession directly influences the nation and its citizens, the educator shall exert every effort to raise professional standards, to promote a cli- mate that encourages the exercise of professional judgment, to achieve conditions that attract persons worthy of the trust to careers in education, and to assist in preventing the practice of the profession by unqualified persons. In fulfillment of the obligation to the profession, the educator— 1. Shall not in an application for a professional position deliberately make a false statement
or fail to disclose a material fact related to competency and qualifications. 2. Shall not misrepresent his/her professional qualifications. 3. Shall not assist any entry into the profession of a person known to be un- qualified in
respect to character, education, or other relevant attribute. 4. Shall not knowingly make a false statement concerning the qualifications of a candidate
for a professional position. 5. Shall not assist a non-educator in the unauthorized practice of teaching. 6. Shall not disclose information about colleagues obtained in the course of professional
service unless disclosure serves a compelling professional purpose or is required by law. 7. Shall not knowingly make false or malicious statements about a colleague. 8. Shall not accept any gratuity, gift, or favor that might impair or appear to influence
professional decisions or actions. —Adopted by the 1975 Representative Assembly, amended 2010
7

Humboldt State University School of Education
Mission Statement
(Adopted 9/18/2013)
The mission of the School of Education is to prepare knowledgeable and effective education professionals to promote excellence and equity with students of diverse talents and cultural backgrounds in rural and urban settings. We develop professionals who are committed to reflective practice, scholarship, collaborative action, and social justice to take leadership in improving the quality of education for all students.
Candidates in School of Education Learning Outcomes
• Demonstrate an ability to work effectively with diverse students, parents, colleagues, staff, and others in the community;
• Develop and maintain safe, positive, and productive educational environments; • Use research-based practice to inform their work; • Demonstrate a coherent theoretical framework of learning and human development that
supports reflection on their practice; • Collaborate on efforts to improve education opportunities for all students.
Philosophical Orientation:
The Education Specialist Credential Program at Humboldt State University promotes the vision that students with mild to moderate to severe disabilities can enjoy academic confidence and developmental, educational growth by interacting with teachers who maximize their learning potential and provide a student-centered learning environment.
Successful Special Education teachers model advocacy for their students. They work well as team players within an expanded educational community student support system of parents, colleagues and community members but also demonstrate strong leadership skills. They are approachable, adaptable and flexible. Through their written and oral communication skills they demonstrate sound subject matter knowledge and pedagogical methods.
Program Learning Outcomes – Education Specialist:
Candidates will understand the characteristics of students with mild to severe disabilities and advocate for their education.
Candidates will develop and implement classroom management and individual behavior plans which include positive behavioral supports.
Candidates will use informal and formal assessment tools to develop and implement effective individualized instructional plans.
Candidates will select, create and adapt instructional strategies and materials based on educational theory and research.
Candidates will describe models and methods of collaboration, which increase the effectiveness of teaching students with disabilities in inclusive environments.
8

Program Completion Requirements to Apply for the Education Specialist Credential



Possession of a baccalaureate or higher degree other than in professional education from a

regionally accredited institution.



Satisfaction of the Basic Skills Requirement (i.e. CBEST).



Completion of the subject matter requirement (i.e. CSET).



Demonstration of knowledge of the principles and provisions of the Constitution of the

United States.



Passage of the Reading Instruction Competence Assessment (RICA) [Passage of the RICA

examination does not apply to Early Childhood Special Education Credential candidates]



Completion of an accredited professional preparation program all courses and fieldwork.

Preliminary Educational Specialist Coursework Mild/ModerateDisabilities

Courses

Units

SPED 777/

EDUC 377 Education of Exceptional Individuals

(2)

SPED 702 Foundations of General and Special Education

(3)

SPED 703 Foundations of Assessment & Program Planning

(3)

SPED 705 Multicultural Special Education

(2)

SPED 706 Applied Behavior Analysis for Teachers

(3)

SPED 707 Curriculum & Instruction – Reading and Language Arts

(3)

SPED 708 Practicum: Reading Instruction

(1)

SPED 709 Curriculum and Instruction Mathematics

(2)

SPED 710 Practicum: Math Instruction

(1)

SPED 711 Curriculum & Instruction – Science, History, and Social Science

(2)

SPED 721 Transition Planning

(3)

SPED 722 Autism Intervention Strategies

(2)

SPED 731 Classroom Management

(1)

SPED 733 Special Education Policies & Procedures

(2)

SPED 736 Curricular & Instructional Skills Seminar

(1)

SPED 737 Non-violent Crisis Intervention-Special Populations

(1)

SPED 738 Student Teaching - Full Semester

(9)

SPED 739 Student Teaching - Spring Semester

(9)

50

9
StudentsEducationStudentPracticeExceptionalities