Theory of Change THEORY OF CHANGE ACTIVITY GUIDE

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Theory of Change THEORY OF CHANGE ACTIVITY GUIDE

Transcript Of Theory of Change THEORY OF CHANGE ACTIVITY GUIDE

Theory of Change

THEORY OF CHANGE ACTIVITY GUIDE

Developing a Theory of Change is a good way to reflect on how each piece of your solution works together to drive towards a desired outcome. This guide will help you make decisions about which prototypes and concepts to take forward in your final service or product offering.
There are many ways to capture a Theory of Change, but the process of articulating and stress testing your assumptions about how and why your solution is going to work is most important. Have your Impact Ladder and Ecosystem Map handy, as you’ll reference those here.

How to Use It Find a space where you can work interactively with your team to map or sketch out the shifts that you are trying to solve for and the concepts that you are excited about taking forward. Use post-it notes if you have them to create a visual grid structure on the wall.
Follow the steps, giving each one time, especially where they offer you question prompts to discuss with your team. As you do this you will prioritize your shifts, the concepts that most effectively address each, and your rationale for how your solution will create change. Maintain a critical and open mind through this process, and repeat steps until you’re confident that your rationale is a strong one. Try having someone outside of your design team join this discussion for fresh eyes and an objective push.
As you narrow on a final model for your solution, use the Impact Ladder (provided again in this activity guide) to quickly capture key components, and then carefully document any assumptions or risks that the process has surfaced.

What Next? If you’re confident that you’ve got a strong rationale for achieving your desired outcome, use the Logic Model method to create a more detailed and clearly structured visualization of this. Then move ahead with planning for implementation.
If you’re less confident in your theory of change, consider another round of prototyping to address any gaps, weaknesses, or risks that you’re now aware of.

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Theory of Change

THEORY OF CHANGE ACTIVITY GUIDE

Step 1
Write out each of the shifts that you are trying to solve for to get to your desired outcome.
These will be shifts around significant moments in your user journey that you have uncovered through your research and tested prototypes on. Place them in a row from right to left across your workspace.

SHIFTS

FROM Girl not knowing services exist for her.

TO Girl is aware of the service and believes it is for her.

FROM Girl feeling shy or afraid to wait at the clinic for an appointment.

TO Girl can book an appointment in advance easily and privately.

FROM Parents fear girls’ sexual health behaviors and needs.

TO Parents are supportive of girls accessing advice and services.

FROM Service providers make girls feel like they are judged.

TO Service providers are welcoming and reassuring to girls.

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Theory of Change

THEORY OF CHANGE ACTIVITY GUIDE

Step 2
Write out each of the concepts that you are excited about taking forward.
These will be the things that have stood out in your prototyping. Place them in a vertical row, so you have a grid structure now.

CONCEPTS

SHIFTS
FROM Girl not knowing services exist for her
TO Girl is aware of service, believes it is for her

FROM Girl feeling shy or afraid to wait at the clinic for an appointment
TO Girl can book an appointment in advance easily and privately

FROM Parents fear girls’ sexual health behaviors and needs
TO Parents are supportive of girls accessing advice and services

FROM Service providers make girls feel like they are judged
TO Service providers are welcoming and reassuring to girls

CONCEPT 1 Radio ads
CONCEPT 2 Facebook campaign
CONCEPT 3 School-based appointments
CONCEPT 4 Service provider toolkit
CONCEPT 5 Parent meetings
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Theory of Change

THEORY OF CHANGE ACTIVITY GUIDE

CONCEPTS

Step 3
Tag your concepts according to their effectiveness in tackling each shift.
Tag your concepts according to their effectiveness in tackling each shift. Based on what you learned in your prototyping, tag each concept as either ‘Addresses this well’ or ‘Addresses this somewhat’. Use 2 different post-it or sticker colors to make it visually easy to see the spread at the end. If it does not address the shift at all leave it blank, to represent a gap. For this step, go with your team’s collective instinct! We’ll probe on our assumptions in the next step.

SHIFTS
FROM Girl not knowing services exist for her
TO Girl is aware of service, believes it is for her

FROM Girl feeling shy or afraid to wait at the clinic for an appointment
TO Girl can book an appointment in advance easily and privately

FROM Parents fear girls’ sexual health behaviors and needs
TO Parents are supportive of girls accessing advice and services

FROM Service providers make girls feel like they are judged
TO Service providers are welcoming and reassuring to girls

CONCEPT 1 Radio ads
CONCEPT 2 Facebook campaign
CONCEPT 3 School-based appointments
CONCEPT 4 Service provider toolkit
CONCEPT 5 Parent meetings

Addresses this
somewhat
Addresses this well
Addresses this well

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Addresses this well

Addresses this
somewhat
Addresses this
somewhat
Addresses this well

Addresses this
somewhat
Addresses this well

Theory of Change

THEORY OF CHANGE ACTIVITY GUIDE

Step 4
Narrow down to a set of priority shifts and concepts
Use the prompts below to explore which shifts are a priority to address; how well those shifts are addressed by your concept; and what combination of shifts and concepts to move forward with for impact.

FIRST, discuss which shifts to tackle, and which are less crucial or out of scope.

Which shifts are well addressed by one or more concepts? Which shifts are not well addressed by concepts? Are those gaps okay for the impact you hope to achieve? Which concepts can be removed?

NARROW Keep the shifts that are most important for achieving impact.
Aim for 3-5. Move the others to the side.

NEXT, assess if your shifts are adequately addressed by your concepts.

Which shifts are well addressed by one or more concepts? Which shifts are not well addressed by concepts? Are those gaps okay for the impact you hope to achieve? Which concepts can be removed?

NARROW. Select the concepts with the most impact. They might address all shifts, or address one shift
really well. Move the others to the side.

FINALLY, stand back and stress test your final combination of shifts and concepts.

Does the logic for how one thing will lead to another hold? What conditions are required to be effective? Are there any gaps* that we have not addressed? Do these gaps pose any risks to our success? Cross-reference the broader set of shifts defined in the Ecosystem Mapping activity during inspiration stage.

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CAPTURE!

Theory of Change

THEORY OF CHANGE ACTIVITY GUIDE

Step 5
Capture your output.
In this final step quickly capture the decisions you have made about the shifts you will commit to addressing, and the concepts that you will take forward to do that. The Impact Ladder template is provided here for your convenience to do this. Take time also to capture important assumptions or issues raised, through your discussion about conditions and risks for success. These will be important later when you implement your solution, and evaluate its effectiveness.
Your Impact Ladder
The lasting social change we would like to contribute to is:

The more near-term outcome that tells us our solution is working is:

The key shifts that need to happen in order to get there are:

From

To

From

To

From

To

From

To

The concepts we are taking forward to address these shifts:

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Theory of Change

THEORY OF CHANGE ACTIVITY GUIDE

Step 5
Capture your output.
In this final step quickly capture the decisions you have made about the shifts you will commit to addressing, and the concepts that you will take forward to do that. The Impact Ladder template is provided here for your convenience to do this. Take time also to capture important assumptions or issues raised, through your discussion about conditions and risks for success. These will be important later when you implement your solution, and evaluate its effectiveness.

The conditions required to ensure this solution will be effective:

The risks we are aware of for how this solution could fail:

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ShiftsConceptsGirlChange TheorySolution