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IIncluded are details about where your water comes from, what

Transcript Of IIncluded are details about where your water comes from, what

THE SANTA CLARITA VALLEY
2018 WATER QUALITY REPORT
The State Water Resources Control Board Division of Drinking Water (DDW) requires community water systems to publish and make available an annual Consumer Confidence Report to provide background on the quality of your water and to show compliance with federal and state drinking water standards.
IThis 2018 Annual Water Quality Report is a snapshot of last year’s water quality. It describes in detail the quality of local water supplies in the Santa Clarita Valley during 2017. Included are details about where your water comes from, what it contains and how it compares to strict State standards. We are committed to providing you with information because informed customers are our best allies. Last year, your tap water again met all U.S. EPA and California State drinking water health standards. Castaic Lake Water Agency (CLWA) and the local water retailers (CLWA Santa Clarita Water Division (SCWD), Los Angeles County Waterworks District #36 (LACWW#36), Newhall County Water District (NCWD) and Valencia Water Company (VWC)) continuously work to ensure you have a reliable and safe drinking water supply at a reasonable cost. We are committed to maintaining and delivering safe drinking water for you, our customers. On January 1, 2018, CLWA, NCWD, SCWD and VWC merged to become the Santa Clarita Valley Water Agency (SCV Water). Our mission is providing responsible water stewardship to ensure the Santa Clarita Valley has reliable supplies of high quality water at a reasonable cost. The new agency is founded on three principles: 1) Economics, with one-time and ongoing savings; 2) Efficiencies and Effectiveness, with even better customer service; and 3) Enhanced water management, working together to modernize and enhance water service for our region. Water quality is only one component of the total value of water. Through a unified approach, SCV Water is better positioned to take a holistic approach to major initiatives and mandates in the coming years, such as groundwater sustainability and watershed management. If you have any questions about this report or water quality, please contact SCV Water, or your retail division directly. Contact information is provided at the end of this report. Sincerely, Matthew G. Stone | General Manager | SCVWA Website: www.yourscvwater.com Adam Ariki | District Engineer | LACWW #36 Website: www.lacwaterworks.org
NOTE: All of the test results in this report were analyzed in 2017 unless noted otherwise. Any chemical not listed in this report was not detected or was detected below the detection level for purposes of reporting. Your local water supplier is in compliance with all drinking water regulations unless a specific violation is noted.

MICROBIOLOGICAL
Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.
Drinking water is tested throughout the distribution systems weekly for Total Coliform (TC) bacteria. TC are naturally occurring in the environment and are indicators for finding possible pathogenic contamination of a drinking water system. The MCL for TC is 5% of all monthly tests showing positive results for larger systems and two positive samples per month in smaller systems. If TC is positively identified through routine testing, the water is further analyzed for Escherichia coli (E. coli) which indicates the potential of fecal contamination. No E. coli was detected in any drinking water system in the Santa Clarita Valley (SCV) last year and no water system was out of compliance with the Total Coliform Rule. Additional tests did not detect the water-borne parasites Cryptosporidium parvum or Giardia lamblia in any sample of Castaic Lake water.
This report reflects changes in drinking water regulatory requirements during 2016. All water systems are required to comply with the state Total Coliform Rule. Effective April 1, 2016, all water systems are also required to comply with the federal Revised Total Coliform Rule. The new federal rule maintains the purpose to protect public health by ensuring the integrity of the drinking water distribution system and monitoring for the presence of microbials (i.e., TC and E. coli bacteria). The U.S. EPA anticipates greater public health protections as the new rule requires water systems that are vulnerable to microbial contamination to identify and fix problems. Water systems that exceed a specified frequency of total coliform occurrences are required to conduct an assessment to determine if any sanitary defects exist. If found, these must be corrected by the water system.
METALS AND SALTS
Metals and salts are required to be tested in groundwater once every three years and in Castaic Lake water every month. Small quantities of naturally occurring arsenic are found in Castaic Lake and in some groundwater wells. Arsenic, a metalloid, is present due to the natural erosion of the rocks that water travels over or through. While your drinking water meets the federal and state standard for arsenic, it does contain low levels of arsenic. The arsenic standard balances the current understanding of arsenic’s possible health effects against the costs of removing arsenic from drinking water. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) continues to research the health effects of low levels of arsenic which is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems.
A number of naturally occurring salts are found in both surface and groundwater. These include chloride, fluoride, nitrate, nitrite, calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium. Collectively, these are referred to as Total Dissolved Solids (TDS). Calcium and magnesium make up what is known as water hardness which can cause scaling as a result of calcium and magnesium precipitates. Fluoride is not added to your drinking water. Any fluoride detection is naturally occurring in the groundwater.
Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 mg/L (as nitrogen) is a health risk for infants less than six months of age. Such nitrate levels in drinking water can interfere with the capacity of the infant’s blood to carry oxygen, resulting in a serious illness; symptoms include shortness of breath and blueness of the skin. Nitrate levels above 10 mg/L (as nitrogen) may also affect the ability of the blood to carry oxygen in other individuals, such as pregnant woman and those with certain specific enzyme deficiencies. If you are caring for an infant, or you are pregnant, you should ask advice from your health care provider. Nitrate was not detected above the MCL in any sample.
LEAD AND COPPER
Every three years, local water retailers are required to sample for lead and copper at specific customer taps as part of the Lead and Copper Rule. Lead and copper is also tested in source water supplies (i.e., groundwater and surface water). If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems especially for pregnant women and young children. No traces of lead were detected in any source waters in the Santa Clarita Valley by any of the local water retailers. Lead in drinking water is primarily
THE SANTA CLARITA VALLEY 2018 WATER QUALITY REPORT

from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing systems. Your water retailer is responsible for providing high quality drinking water but cannot control the variety of materials used in customer plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your home’s water, you can have your water tested by a private laboratory. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at www.epa.gov/lead.
In January 2017, the DDW established a voluntary program for lead testing in school drinking water. The number of schools that requested lead be tested in their drinking water is shown in the following table:

Number of schools that requested lead testing

NCWD SCWD

1

10

VWC WW #36

4

0

ORGANIC COMPOUNDS
Organic chemical contaminants including synthetic and volatile organic compounds (VOC) are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production. Castaic Lake and local groundwater wells are tested at least annually for VOCs. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were found in trace amounts (below the MCL) at a few locations. Consumption of water containing TCE or PCE in excess of the MCL over many years may lead to liver problems and an increased risk of cancer.

TURBIDITY
Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of the water. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of water quality. High turbidity can hinder the effectiveness of disinfectants. Furthermore, at the treatment plants, turbidity is monitored because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration systems.

DRINKING WATER SOURCE ASSESSMENT AND PROTECTION The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include: • Microbial contaminants such as viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage
treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.
• Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, that can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
• Pesticides and herbicides that may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff and residential uses.
• Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals that are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, agricultural application and septic systems.
• Radioactive contaminants that can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the USEPA and the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Division of Drinking Water (DDW) prescribe regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations and California law also establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that provide protection for public health. Additional information on bottled water is available on the California Department of Public Health website (https://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/CEH/ DFDCS/Pages/fdbprograms/foodsafetyprogram/water.aspx).

THE RESULTS OF THOUSANDS OF TESTS ON YOUR WATER

TABLE LEGEND 1 For valves that are blank in Tesoro, refer to the first CLWA column. 2 Depending on annual temperatures 3 Some people who use water containing trichloroethylene or tetrachloroethylene in excess of the MCL
over many years may experience liver problems and may have increased risk of getting cancer 4 There are three MCLs for this parameter: The first is the recommended long term MCL. The second is
the upper long term MCL. The third is the short term MCL.

5 The NL for Boron = 1000 ug/L or 1 mg/L 6 The results reflect the water quality of a single source that was briefly
used in this area 7 There is currently no MCL for hexavalent chromium. The previous MCL
of 10ug/L was withdrawn on September 11, 2017. 8 Pinetree used majority imported water (see first CLWA column for
data). Data in this column represent 1% groundwater.

PARAMETERS/CONSTITUENTS UNITS

INORGANICS

Aluminum

mg/L

Arsenic

ug/L

Fluoride2

mg/L

Barium

mg/L

Nitrate (as Nitrogen)

mg/L

MCL (AL)
1 10 2 1 10

PHG

Castaic Lake Water Agency Castaic Lake Water Agency

(MCLG) DLR (6% GroWunhdowlaetesra/le94D%ivSiusrifoance Water) PerchWlohroalteesTarleeaDtimviesniotnPlant

Castaic Lake Water Agency Santa Clarita Water Division

Valenica Water Company

Newhall County Water District Newhall County Water District

Castaic6

Newhall

RANGE
Minimum Maximum

TYPICAL

RANGE
Minimum Maximum

TYPICAL

RANGE

Minimum Maximum

TYPICAL

RANGE

TYPICAL

Minimum Maximum

RANGE
Minimum Maximum

TYPICAL

RANGE
Minimum Maximum

TYPICAL

0.6 0.05










0.004 2
2.7




2.5



2.70






1

0.1
0.2

0.2

0.2

0.5

0.3

0.3

0.5

0.4

0.2

0.8

0.4

0.4

0.5

0.4

0.4

0.4

0.4

2

0.1




0.11





10

0.4

0.5

0.8

0.6

2.9

3.4

3.2

2.2

7.2

4.5

1.1

6.1

4.2


0.7

0.4

3.2

7.5

6.1

ORGANICS
Trichloroethylene (TCE)3 Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)3

ug/L

5

ug/L

5

1.7 0.5
0.7


0.06 0.5
0.5





0.92













DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

Bromate RVWTP

ug/L

10

Bromate ESFP

ug/L

10

Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)

ug/L

60

Trihalomethanes, Total (TTHMs)

ug/L

80

0.1

5


7.7

6.0

0.1

5

5.4

10

7.8

(0)

1


14

9.1

(0)

1

12

66

36

7.9

27.0

12.2


11

23.0

72.0

45.1

19

56

5.8

7.8

11.0

9.0


4.0

36

26.0

59.0

36.3


15.5

MICROBIOLOGICAL

Coliform % Positive Samples

%

5

0

0

0

0

0

1.6

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

CLARITY / TURBIDITY

Surface Water Only RVWTP Surface Water Only ESFP

NTU TT = 1 NTU None TT = 95% of Samples < 0.2 NTU
NTU TT = 1 NTU None TT = 95% of Samples < 0.2 NTU

0.58 100
0.33 96

RADIOLOGICAL

Alpha Activity, Gross Beta Activity, Gross Radium 228 Uranium Year of Analysis
LEAD AND COPPER
Copper – Consumer Taps Lead – Consumer Taps Year of Analysis
SECONDARY STANDARDS
Chlorides4 Color Odor-Threshold Sulfates4 Turbidity Total Dissolved Solids4 Conductivity4 Manganese Iron

pCi/L

15

0

3


10

3


9.5




4.4

4.7

4.6

pCi/L

50*

0

4







5.7


pCi/L

---

0.019 1






pCi/L

20

0.43 1
1.6

1.6


2.4

2.4

6.1

8.0

6.9

1.3

5.3

2.8


1.2

2017

2017

2014 - 2017

2016

2014

2015

90th Percentile

No. of sites No. of sites Tested Above the AL

90th Percentile

No. of Sites No. of Sites Test Above the AL

90th Percentile

No. of Sites Tested

No. of Sites Above the AL

90th No. of Sites Percentile Tested

No. of Sites Above the AL

ug/L

(1300)

300 50

340

50

0

390

66

0

620

20

0

1100

30

2

ug/L

(15)

0.2

5


50

0


66

1


20

0


30

2

2015

2016

2015

2015

RANGE
Minimum Maximum

TYPICAL

RANGE

TYPICAL

Minimum Maximum

RANGE
Minimum Maximum

TYPICAL

RANGE
Minimum Maximum

TYPICAL

mg/L 250/500/600

58

100

85

32

40

37

96

160

125

28

130

87

92

100

95

41

47

44

Units

15

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

<5

5

<5

<5

<5

<5

TON

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

mg/L 250/500/600

1

41

65

55

130

150

140

98

260

156

85

440

236

83

130

114

160

270

215

NTU

5

0.1
0.15

0.11


0.29

0.10

0.10

0.28

0.18


1.7


0.16

2.60

1.01

0.45

1.00

0.73

mg/L 500/1000/1500

230

350

310

410

550

510

640

910

764

490

1400

860

470

590

543

560

790

675

uS / cm 900/1600/2200

380

550

500

620

750

710

1000 1400

1200

770

2000

1310

780

960

887

820

1100

960

ug/L

50

0.02


20





20




ug/L

300

0.1




240



170


20

180

100


40

20

ADDITIONAL TESTS

Chromium, hexavalent (CrVI)

ug/L

Year of Analysis (CrVI)

Boron5

mg/L

Calcium

mg/L

Magnesium

mg/L

Sodium

mg/L

Potassium

mg/L

Hardness as CaCO3

mg/L

pH

Units

Alkalinity as CaCO3

mg/L

0.02 7 1

1.3

1.3




2.0



1

1.3

1.15

2017

2017

2017

2017

2017

2017

0.1 0.15

0.21

0.19

0.25

0.28

0.27

0.38

1.90

1.01

0.26

1.10

0.51

25

34

30

78

97

91

77

120

96

72

181

115

52

67

62

86

140

113

11

15

14

16

20

18

18

49

29

18

49

36

20

28

25

19

34

27

47

78

67

59

70

66

89

140

115

54

140

92

76

99

90

64

72

68

2.8

3.9

3.4

2.4

3.1

2.6

2.8

4.7

3.9

2.0

6.4

4.0

3.4

4.4

4.0

2.6

2.6

2.6

110

150

130

260

320

300

270

440

362

254

653

435

210

280

257

290

490

390

7.3

8.4

8.0

7.4

7.7

7.6

7.6

8.0

7.8

7.4

7.8

7.6

7.9

8.0

8.0

7.9

8.0

8.0

73

120

89

180

220

210

210

360

296

210

330

263

160

210

187

190

230

210

AL DLR ESFP MCL MCLG mg / L ug / L uS / cm

Action Level Detection Limit for Reporting Earl Schmidt Filtration Plant Maximum Contaminant Level Maximum Contaminant Level Goal milligrams / Liter micrograms / Liter microsiemens / centimeter

NA

Not Analyzed / Not Applicable

NTU

Nephlometric Turbidity Units

pCi / L picocurries / Liter

PHG Public Health Goal

RVWTP Rio Vista Water Treatment Plant

TT

Treatment Technique

* SWRCB considers 50 pCi/L to be the level

of concern for Beta particles.

Newhall County Water District Pinetree8

RANGE

Minimum Maximum

N/A

0.1

N/A

2.0

N/A

0.3

N/A

0.1

N/A

1.2

TYPICAL
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Newhall County Water Distric Tesoro1

RANGE

TYPICAL

Minimum Maximum

Los Angeles County

Water Works District

#36

RANGE

TYPICAL

Minimum Maximum



0.3

0.3

0.3


0.6

2.3

1.5

N/A


N/A

N/A


N/A


8.8

12.0

10.5

10.0

16.0

13.1


30.0

55.0

36.7

44.0

68.0

55.1

2.7

6.3

4.8

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

N/A


N/A


3.8


N/A

2.0

2017

90th Percentile

No. of Sites Tested

250

20


20

2015

RANGE
Minimum Maximum

N/A

100

N/A

<5

N/A

2

N/A

76

N/A

1.50

N/A

440

N/A

760

N/A


N/A

180

N/A
No. of Sites Above the AL
0 0
TYPICAL
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

90th Percentile

No. of Sites Tested

510

20

5.7

20

2017

RANGE
Minimum Maximum

No. of Sites Above the AL
0 0
TYPICAL



2.5

2012 - 2015

90th Percentile

No. of Sites Tested

290

20

ND

20

2017

RANGE
Minimum Maximum

12

12

<5

<5

1.0

2

99

99

0.1

1.7

320

320

No. of Sites Above the AL
0 0
TYPICAL
12 <5 1 99 0.3 320


N/A


N/A

2017

N/A

0.47

N/A

N/A

52

N/A

N/A

17

N/A

N/A

86

N/A

N/A

3.3

N/A

N/A

200

N/A

N/A

8.2

N/A

N/A

140

N/A

1.1

1.1

1.1

2014

22

22

22

4.1

4.1

4.1

88.9

88.9

88.9

1.8

1.8

1.8

68

68

68

6.8

8.3

8.0

170

170

170

The local water retailers completed the Drinking Water Source Assessment and Protection (DWSAP) program for existing groundwater sources in 2002. DWSAPs are also completed for each new groundwater well placed into service by the retailers. Each DWSAP looks at vulnerability to contamination and assesses potential sources of contamination from sources such as: dry cleaners, auto repair shops, gas stations, medical facilities, schools and other facilities located in the vicinity of each groundwater source. For more information regarding DWSAPs, contact your local water retailer whose contact information is included in this report or visit the following website: https://www.waterboards.ca.gov/drinking_water/certlic/drinkingwater/DWSAP.html. You may request a summary of the assessment be sent to you by contacting the SWRCB, DDW district engineer at (818) 551-2004.
CLWA PROVIDES WATER TO LOCAL RETAILERS

NCWD Castaic

NCWD Tesoro

NCWD Pinetree

NCWD Newhall
CLWA receives and treats surface water from the State Water Project (SWP) and other imported sources. The SWP consists of facilities operated by the California Department of Water Resources to transfer water to SWP contractors for agricultural or urban supply uses. CLWA operates two water treatment plants, the Earl Schmidt Filtration Plant in Castaic and the Rio Vista Water Treatment Plant in Saugus. The SCV’s four water retailers distribute the treated imported water together with groundwater from the Alluvial Aquifer and the Saugus Formation. Water quality information for your area is presented in the table contained in this report.
CLWA Santa Clarita Water Division provides water to a portion of the City of Santa Clarita and unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County including Saugus, Canyon Country and Newhall. Customers received approximately 88% imported water and 12% local groundwater in 2017.
Los Angeles County Waterworks District #36 serves customers located in Hasley Canyon and Val Verde. Customers received 0% imported water and 100% local groundwater in 2017.
Newhall County Water District serves customers located in the Castaic, Newhall, Pinetree and Tesoro del Valle areas. In 2017, Castaic customers received 55% imported water and 45% local groundwater, Newhall customers received 64% imported water and 36% local groundwater. Pinetree customers received 99.7% imported water and 0.3% groundwater, and Tesoro del Valle customers received 100% imported water.
Valencia Water Company supplies water to customers in Valencia, Stevenson Ranch, and parts of Castaic, Saugus, and Newhall. In 2017, customers received 65% imported water, 33% local groundwater and 2% recycled water (delivered to large landscape customers).

CHEMICALS IN THE NEWS – PERCHLORATE
Perchlorate is an inorganic chemical used in solid rocket propellant, fireworks, explosives and a variety of industries. It usually gets into drinking water as a result of environmental contamination from historic industrial operations that used, stored, or disposed of perchlorate and its salts. Perchlorate has been shown to interfere with uptake of iodide by the thyroid gland, and thereby reduce the production of thyroid hormones leading to adverse affects associated with inadequate hormone levels.
A known perchlorate contaminant plume has been identified and several wells have tested positive for perchlorate. In October 2007, the DDW adopted an MCL of 6 ug/L for perchlorate. DDW issued an amendment to CLWA’s Domestic Water Supply Permit on December 30, 2010, authorizing the use of the perchlorate-treatment facility and, on January 25, 2011, CLWA introduced the treated water into the distribution system in full compliance with the requirements of its amended water-supply permit.
RADIOLOGICAL TESTS
Radioactive compounds can be found in both ground and surface waters, and can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. Testing is conducted for two types of radioactivity: alpha and beta. If none is detected at concentrations above five picoCuries per liter (pCi/L) no further testing is required. If it is detected above 5 pCi/L, the water must be checked for uranium and/or radium. Monitoring for radionuclides can be different for each groundwater well. Because of this, not all data may be from the 2017 calendar year.
WATER QUALITY DEFINITIONS
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. The USEPA/Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants and are available from the USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).
USEPA, DDW and the California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA) set goals and legal standards for the quality of drinking water. These standards are intended to protect consumers from contaminants in drinking water. Most of the standards are based on the concentration of contaminants, but a few are based on a Treatment Technique (TT), a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).
The following definitions and acronyms are used for drinking water compliance and reporting purposes:
Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. Primary MCLs are set as close to the PHGs (or MCLGs) as is economically and technologically feasible. Secondary MCLs are set to protect the odor, taste and appearance of drinking water.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) or Public Health Goal (PHG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. PHGs are set by Cal/EPA. MCLGs are set by the USEPA.
Primary Drinking Water Standard (PDWS): MCLs and MRDLs for contaminants that affect health along with their monitoring and reporting requirements, and water treatment requirements.
Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

THE SANTA CLARITA VALLEY 2018 WATER QUALITY REPORT

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG): The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
Detection Limit for Purposes of Reporting (DLR): The smallest concentration of a contaminant that can be measured and reported. DLRs are set by the DDW (same as MRL, Minimum Reporting Level, set by USEPA).
Regulatory Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.
Notification Level (NL): State guidelines developed by DDW that address the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers public notification.
Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.
Primary Drinking Water Contaminants: Contaminants associated with the protection of public health and that have enforceable standards.
Secondary Drinking Water Contaminants: Contaminants associated with aesthetic considerations such as taste, color and odor, and that have non-enforceable guidelines.

DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS
CLWA uses ozone and chloramines to disinfect its water while the water retailers use various forms of chlorine and chloramines to disinfect their groundwater sources. Disinfection By-Products (DBPs), which include Total Trihalomethanes (TTHMs) and Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), are generated by the interaction between naturally occurring organic matter and disinfectants such as chlorine. TTHMs and HAA5 are measured at multiple locations throughout the distribution system. Each location is averaged once per quarter and reported as a running average by location. The DBP bromate is formed when the primary disinfectant ozone is applied converting bromide to bromate. Bromate is measured weekly in the surface water treatment plant and compliance is based on a running annual average.
UNREGULATED CONTAMINANT MONITORING RULE
The USEPA requires utilities to sample for emerging contaminates as part of the Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule (UCMR). Every five (5) years the USEPA prepares a list of unregulated contaminants for drinking water suppliers to analyze. UCMR results are then used to assist in the development of future drinking water regulations. The third round of UCMR sampling (UCMR 3) was completed by all water retailers between 2013-2015. Currently, the USEPA is preparing for UCMR 4. For more information please contact your local water retailer or visit the USEPA website www. epa.gov/dwucmr/learn-about-unregulated-contaminant-monitoring-rule.

Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable. Si usted quisiera informacion de este reporte traducido en español, comuniquese con su distribuidor local de agua que se muestra arriba.
Castaic Lake Water Agency (now Santa Clarita Valley Water Agency (SCVWA)) Jeff Koelewyn | 661-297-1600 x223 E-mail: [email protected] | Website: www.yourscvwater.com
The Board of Directors meets at 6:30 pm generally on the first and third Tuesdays of each month at the Rio Vista Administration Building at 27234 Bouquet Canyon Road, Santa Clarita, 91350. Dates may vary; please visit website at http://yourscvwater.com/index.php/governance/#board-meetings for the Board calendar.
CLWA Santa Clarita Water Division (now SCVWA Santa Clarita Water Division) Ryan Bye | 661-255-8223 x117 E-mail: [email protected] | Website: www.yourscvwater.com
Newhall County Water District (now SCVWA Newhall Water Division) Ernesto Velazquez | 661-259-3610 x216 E-mail: [email protected] | Website: www.yourscvwater.com
Valencia Water Company (now SCVWA Valencia Water Division) Jenny Anderson | 661-295-6579 E-mail: [email protected] | Website: www.yourscvwater.com
The Finance and Operations Committee (for all three SCVWA Divisions) meets at 5:30 pm on the second Thursday of each month at the SCWD office at 26521 Summit Circle, Santa Clarita, 91350
Los Angeles County Waterworks District No. 36 Bing Hua, P.E. | 626-300-3337 County of Los Angeles/ Waterworks Division E-mail: [email protected] | Website: www.lacwaterworks.org
Waterworks District No. 36 is governed by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors that meets every Tuesday at 9:30 am at the Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration, 500 West Temple Street Room 381B, Los Angeles, 90012 On Tuesdays following a Monday holiday, the meetings begin at 1:00 pm.
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