Mental Health Education Literacy - New York State Education

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Mental Health Education Literacy - New York State Education

Transcript Of Mental Health Education Literacy - New York State Education

MENTAL HEALTH EDUCATION LITERACY IN SCHOOLS:
LINKING TO A CONTINUUM OF WELL- BEING
COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE
JULY 2018

NYSED Mental Health Education Literacy in Schools
Contents
Foreword ......................................................................................................................... 4 Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 5 Acknowledgements ......................................................................................................... 6
New York State Agency Partners................................................................................. 6 Mental Health Overview and Legislative Background ..................................................... 8 Mental Health Education in the Classroom ..................................................................... 9
Mental Health............................................................................................................. 10 New York State Framework for Mental Health Education Instruction......................... 12
1. Self-Management............................................................................................... 12 2. Relationships...................................................................................................... 16 3. Resource Management ...................................................................................... 20 Multiple Dimensions of Addressing Mental Health Well-being: .................................. 24 Physical Education, Health Education, Nutrition and ................................................. 24 Social Emotional Learning ......................................................................................... 24 School and Community Agency Partnerships ............................................................... 29 Mental Health Resources Fostering School and Community Agency Partnerships ... 30 Role of School-Based Structures and ........................................................................ 31 Local Community Resources ..................................................................................... 31 First Line Contacts for Community-Based Mental Health Resources ........................ 33 Resources for Building a Tool Kit Creating School, ................................................... 34 Community, Family and Student Partnerships ........................................................... 34 Embedding Mental Health Well-being to Support Positive Climate and Culture............ 35 The Relationship Between School Climate and Well-being ....................................... 36 School Frameworks for Supporting Mental Health Well-being ................................... 37 Comprehensive School Climate Supporting Mental Health and Well-being:.............. 40 Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) Frameworks................................................ 40 Key Mental Health and Well-being Benchmarks for a Positive School Climate and Culture ....................................................................................................................... 47 Implementation.............................................................................................................. 53 Sample Policy on Integrating Mental Health Education and Well-being within an Entire School Environment ................................................................................................... 54 Glossary of Services and Terminology.......................................................................... 59
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NYSED Mental Health Education Literacy in Schools
Additional Resources ................................................................................................. 61 Appendix Section .......................................................................................................... 67
Education Law §804 – Appendix A ............................................................................ 68 Amendment of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education-Appendix B........ 72 New York State Mental Health Education Advisory Council-Appendix C ................... 74 Resources Supporting Mental Health Well-being-Appendix D ................................... 78
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NYSED Mental Health Education Literacy in Schools
Foreword
The purpose of this Comprehensive Guide entitled, “Mental Health Education Literacy in Schools: Linking to a Continuum of Well-being”, is to provide educators, school district personnel, parents/guardians, students, and community organizations with information on mental health education provided in schools pursuant to Education Law §804 (see Appendix A: Education Law §804) and Commissioner’s Regulation §135.3 (see Appendix B: Amendment of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education). This document provides guidance for developing effective mental health education instruction in the classroom, that complies with the recent amendments to Education Law §804, while also looking at embedding mental health well-being within the broader context of the entire school’s environment.
According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness1 half of all chronic mental illnesses begin by age 14. The recent amendments to Education Law §804 and Commissioner’s Regulation §§ 135.1, 135.3 provide an opportunity to facilitate conversations on mental health education, awareness, prevention and well-being in New York State (NYS) schools as well as communities across the State. When students learn about mental health as an important aspect of overall health and well-being, the likelihood increases that they will be able to effectively recognize signs and symptoms related to mental health issues in themselves and others and will know where to turn for help. In turn, the stigma that surrounds mental health will decrease.
Quality mental health education is especially urgent right now, as NYS and our nation confront serious issues that impact our children’s lives both in and out of school, such as teen suicide, bullying and cyberbullying, and opioid and alcohol addictions. The “Mental Health Education Literacy in Schools: Linking to a Continuum of Well-being” Comprehensive Guide provides evidence-based and best practices instructional resources and materials to assist local education agencies (LEAs) with classroom instruction on educating students on mental health well-being and the overall connection between health and success.
Therefore, the inclusion of mental health within existing health education is critical to the healthy development of all young people.
DISCLAIMER: Information contained within this document does not necessarily represent the views, nor is being promoted by the New York State Education Department (NYSED), New York State Agency Partners or the New York State Mental Health Education Advisory Council, but is being shared as evidenced-based information and/or best practices information and resources identified by professionals representing diverse and valuable expertise in the fields of education, pupil personnel services and mental health. It is recommended that LEAs review this document with their school attorneys and utilize the wealth of education resources to develop and/or adopt their own curriculum aligned with the New York State Learning Standards, while tailoring instruction and programs based on identified local level needs. This Comprehensive Guide is not meant to replace existing school curriculum, but to be used as a resource within existing curriculum and school frameworks to enhance mental health literacy.
1 https://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-By-the-Numbers.
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NYSED Mental Health Education Literacy in Schools
Introduction
The New York State Education Department Commissioner MaryEllen Elia, the New York State Office of Mental Health Commissioner Ann Marie T. Sullivan, M.D and Mental Health Association in New York State, Inc., Chief Executive Officer Glenn Liebman and their staffs have partnered to passionately engage in numerous collaborative and successful education outreach initiatives across NYS over the past year to promote mental health literacy for our youth and families. As shared with the Department by our partners who have expertise in mental health and education, there are four key mental health literacy components important to everyone’s well-being and success:
1. Understanding how to obtain and maintain good mental health; 2. Decreasing stigma related to mental health; 3. Enhancing help-seeking efficacy (know when, where, and how to obtain good
health with skills to promote self-care); and 4. Understanding mental disorders (i.e., anxiety, depression) and treatments.
Therefore, the purpose of the “Mental Health Education Literacy in Schools: Linking to a Continuum of Well-Being” Comprehensive Guide (Comprehensive Guide) is to support mental health education instruction at the elementary level taught by the classroom teacher, and at the secondary level taught by the certified health educator within the realm of the Health Education Program as required by Education Law §804 and Commissioner’s Regulation §§135.1,135.3. The Comprehensive Guide’s first section “Mental Health Education in the Classroom”, and second section “Multiple Dimensions of Mental Health” have been specifically developed for educators instructing on mental health in the classroom to use as a framework for developing their local level health curricula.
This framework supports the current NYS Learning Standards for Health, Physical Education, and Family and Consumer Sciences at Three Levels and is to be used in conjunction with the current NYS Health Education Guidance Document to Achieving New York State Learning Standards in Health. The New York State Education Department expects schools to utilize this Comprehensive Guide to develop or adopt its own curriculum aligned with the New York State Learning Standards, and to tailor instruction and programs based on needs identified at the local level. Although this section is intended for use by administrators and elementary teachers that instruct on Health Education as well as health educators and health coordinators, it is recommended that schools utilize the remaining sections of this Comprehensive Guide with all staff, students, families and community agencies when applicable, to develop a positive school climate and culture of mental health well-being and awareness.
With the expansion of mental health education in schools, it is expected that school personnel, students, families and communities will be more openly discussing mental health well-being and mental health challenges which, in turn, will positively impact change in our children’s awareness of mental health prevention, treatment and stigma.
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NYSED Mental Health Education Literacy in Schools
Acknowledgements
The New York State Education Department would like to extend appreciation to all of our dedicated statewide partners noted below that provided the leadership, expertise and resources necessary to continually guide and inform the work of this critical initiative during the 2017-2018 school year. Through the perseverance as individuals and cohesive colleagues, this Comprehensive Guide has been developed to support schools across the State in instructing students at all grade levels in mental health education, pursuant to amendments made to Education Law §804.
New York State Agency Partners
New York State Office of Mental Health
Commissioner Ann Marie T. Sullivan, M.D. Associate Commissioner Donna Bradbury
Mental Health Association in New York State, Inc.
Chief Executive Officer Glenn Liebman Deputy Director Melissa Ramirez Director of Education Amy Molloy Director of Public Policy John Richter
New York State Mental Health Education Advisory Council
In August of 2017, the New York State Education Department (NYSED), with the support of the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) and the Mental Health Association in New York State, Inc. (MHANYS), established the New York State Mental Health Education Advisory Council (Advisory Council) to inform and guide the important work of implementing the amendments to Education Law §804 made by Chapter 390 of the Laws of 2016 and Chapter 1 of the Laws of 2017. The Advisory Council includes over 75 expert cross-disciplinary and cross-sector partners working collaboratively with a goal of assisting schools to effectively maximize students’ knowledge and understanding of the multiple dimensions of health, including mental health wellness (see Attachment C: New York State Mental Health Advisory Council).
The Advisory Council was charged with developing a guide to support instruction in mental health and wellness in classrooms. Through dedicated ongoing work, the Advisory Council collectively also developed evidence-based and best practices resources to build capacity for enhancing mental health wellness for schools, students, families and communities. The Advisory Council is recommending schools embrace and expand obligations to support elementary and secondary level educator’s instruction on mental health, by including a comprehensive approach supporting the enhancement of mental health well-being. Schools can and should go beyond providing only classroom
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NYSED Mental Health Education Literacy in Schools
instruction on mental health and focus efforts on comprehensive integration by developing a positive school climate and culture. NYSED would also like to extend a sincere thank you to the passionate year-long commitment of the members of the Advisory Council. The robust comprehensive guide and resources for schools contained herein have been developed though the active sharing and integration of current knowledge and best practice principles by each expert member.
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NYSED Mental Health Education Literacy in Schools
Mental Health Overview and Legislative Background
Mental health is a critical part of overall health and well-being and is important throughout the life cycle, affecting thinking and learning, feelings and actions, that ultimately relate to healthy decision making2. “In childhood and throughout adolescence, mental health means attaining developmental and emotional milestones, while learning healthy social skills and how to cope with challenging situations. Mentally healthy children/youth have a positive quality of life and can function well at home, in school, and in their communities”3. When young people are educated about mental health, the likelihood increases they will be able to effectively recognize signs and symptoms in themselves and others and will know where to turn for help. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “focusing on establishing healthy behaviors during childhood is more effective than trying to change unhealthy behaviors during adulthood”4.
Health education that respects the importance of mental health, as well as the challenges of mental illness, will help young people and their families and communities feel more comfortable seeking help, improve academic performance and, most importantly, even save lives.
In May 2018, the Board of Regents adopted amendments to Commissioner’s Regulation §§135.1 and 135.3 to comply with amendments made to Education Law §804 by Chapter 390 of the Laws of 2016 and Chapter 1 of the Laws of 2017 which clarified that a satisfactory program in health education developed in accordance with the needs of pupils in all grades must include instruction in the several dimensions of health, and must:
• Include mental health and the relation of physical and mental health; and • Enhance student understanding, attitudes and behaviors that promote health, well-
being and human dignity.
To view the amendments to Commissioner’s Regulations on health education, the NYS Mental Health Education Advisory Council’s Panel Presentation to the Board of Regents, the Advisory Council Membership and the Advisory Council’s twenty-six recommendations, please click on the following: NYS Board of Regents Mental Health Education May 2018. (Also, see Appendix B for the amendments to Commissioner’s Regulations on Health Education).
2 https://www.mentalhealth.gov/basics/what-is-mental-health. 3 https://www.cdc.gov/childrensmentalhealth/basics.html. 4 https://www.cdc.gov/healthyschools/wscc/index.htm.
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NYSED Mental Health Education Literacy in Schools
Mental Health Education in the Classroom
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NYSED Mental Health Education Literacy in Schools
Mental Health
According to the World Health Organization (WHO)5, mental health is defined as a state of well-being in which every individual realizes their own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to their community. Fully embracing this definition requires a cultural shift that views mental health as an integral part of overall health.
As part of overall health and wellness, mental health includes: • A sense of self-esteem and self-confidence; • The ability to identify, express and regulate emotions; • The ability to set and achieve goals; • Recognition of one’s creatives skills; • The ability to expand knowledge and skills; • The ability to feel and show empathy for others; and • The ability to create and maintain satisfying relationships.
Further, a fuller definition of mental health will include an understanding of the effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) on an individual’s overall health. ACEs are stressful or traumatic events that can lead to social, emotional and cognitive impairment, which, in turn, can lead to the adoption of high-risk behaviors, disease, and early death6. Children who experience these traumatic events often struggle in school. The cumulative effect of trauma and toxic stress can be significant and result in unhealthy behaviors, an inability to focus and process information and challenging responses to classroom and social situations.
The following recommendations promote mental health in the educational setting: • Support children and youth in the development of: o Positive routines and practices; o Physical activity, exercise and play; o Good nutrition; o Regular sleep habits; o Stress management skills; and o Caring relationships. • Institute efforts to reduce stigma around mental health. • Foster warm and caring relationships. • Promote positive school climate and culture. • Support development of social-emotional skills and help-seeking behaviors.
5 http://www.who.int/features/factfiles/mental_health/en/. 6 http://www.ncmedicaljournal.com/content/79/3/166.full.
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