Project Management for Crews - Boy Scouts of America

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Project Management for Crews - Boy Scouts of America

Transcript Of Project Management for Crews - Boy Scouts of America

Project Management for Crews
Facilitator Guide

PROJECT MANAGEMENT FOR CREWS
Copyright © 2018 Scouting U, Boy Scouts of America All rights reserved. No part of this product may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any
form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Document Revision Revision Date: 2/27/2018
512-947 2018 Printing

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Course Information ................................................................................................. 2 Introduction ................................................................................................................... 3
Defining a Project ................................................................................................ 3 Terms ......................................................................................................................... 4 Guidelines for Selecting Projects ................................................................... 5 Team Activity .......................................................................................................... 5 Planning ........................................................................................................................... 7 Logging Hours ....................................................................................................... 7 Planning Process Steps ...................................................................................... 8 Scope Statement .................................................................................................. 9 Budgeting .............................................................................................................. 11 A Project Plan ..................................................................................................... 13 Managing Resources & People ................................................................... 15 Sourcing Materials ........................................................................................... 15 Handling Donations ......................................................................................... 16 Team Dynamics .................................................................................................. 16 Communicating with Your Team ................................................................. 19 Implementation ....................................................................................................... 21 Following Established Timelines .................................................................. 21 Executing a Project Plan ................................................................................ 22 Following Through ................................................................................................ 24 Sustainability ....................................................................................................... 24 Debriefing ............................................................................................................ 25 Reporting Requirements ................................................................................. 26 Conclusion ................................................................................................................... 28 Appendix ..................................................................................................................... 30
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COURSE INFORMATION
Learning Objectives
• Define common project management terminology. • Explain what a project is, and how to organize one. • Apply project management skills in a Scouting situation. • Interpret team dynamics to further the aims of a project. • Design budgets and timelines that support the goals of a project. • Explain the necessary processes to accomplish a project successfully. • Explain the value of sustainability in the project management process. • Explain the value in collecting feedback to improve future projects.
Time Frame
• Approximately 3 hours.
Materials Required
• Flip charts, whiteboards, or other means to record participants’ answers during discussions.
• Copies of Appendix B for each participant (optional: copies of other appendixes).
• Sticky-notes. • Paper and pencils for each participant.
Delivery Method
The material is delivered through lecture, discussion, and breakout sessions. The location can be any available setting that allows for comfortable learning and can accommodate the size of the group.
Class Composition
A class should be composed of less than 30 members, divided into smaller teams for breakout activities. The course should be taught by youth leaders who have experience planning large projects (example: have earned their Summit Award, served as activity chair for a major outing, etc.). This training is designed to be given at the unit level, but can be adapted for council level training if necessary due to limited crew resources. Additional facilitators may be assigned to help with group discussion.
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INTRODUCTION
Time: 30 - 40 minutes
Learning Objectives
As a result of this module, participants will: • Define the nature of a project. • Practice selecting a project. • Utilize appropriate terminology.
Defining a Project
Venturing is characterized as a program designed for older youth to grow in experience in the areas of adventure, leadership, personal growth, and service. As a part of this, Venturers are often are asked to provide leadership for an adventurous event or a service-related activity at some point during their Venturing journey. In order to ensure the activity will be successful, it is important to utilize proper project management techniques.
Project management is the application of skills, knowledge, and resources to accomplish a task or complete a goal. A project does not need to be permanent, and could be as small as organizing a local food drive or assisting with the promotion of a camp out. Inversely, a project can be very large and consist of dozens of volunteers investing a significant amount of time to ensure its success.
This training will prepare Venturers to identify, plan, and execute projects in an efficient manner, while encouraging personal growth and development. Throughout this course, there will be opportunities to reflect on content, apply learned skills through activities, and discuss alternate methods of accomplishing goals, with the goal of ensuring that participants are able to apply their knowledge to a diverse array of situations.
Discussion
Lead participants in a discussion about the nature of a project, asking them some of the following questions to prompt conversation:
• What is a project? What is not a project? • What have been some examples of projects that you have worked on? • What makes a project successful? • Why do you think that there is no clear definition of what constitutes a
project? • How can a project impact individuals? Communities? • When is it acceptable to say that a project is completed or done?
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The conversation should be relaxed, with maximum input from participants. If not all questions are asked or answered, ensure that at a minimum the discussion touches on the following points of emphasis.
• A project can be any event, activity, structure, or process that benefits a person or group of people.
• A project is guided by a set of goals, and is inspired by a perceived need or a passion.
• A project is not necessarily permanent, however, it must be “durable”, meaning that it must last for its defined period of existence in a sustainable manner.
• In the abstract sense, a project must have a beginning and an end, in addition to yielding distinct or unique products. These products may be tangible or intangible.
• A project can be considered successful if it accomplishes its stated goals.
• A project can impact an individual by providing a tangible benefit, such as a physical good or product, or by providing a positive experience, such as the feeling of having helped out those less fortunate than you.
• Likewise, a project can benefit a community by providing an opportunity to unite the community behind an idea or passion, as well as through a tangible good or product.
Terms
It is important to understand the roles of each person involved in a project. • Project Manager: Person in charge of the project. They are the driving force behind the planning, implementation, and personnel coordination throughout the project. • Stakeholder: Person who has an interest in the project; they are directly impacted by the results and care about how the project is completed. • Sponsor: Person who pays for the project, or is the primary donor of material resources. • Team Members: Those who help with the implementation of the project. • Vendor/Third Party: Outside entity providing a product or service to be used in the project.
• Beneficiary: the primary person who benefits from the completion project.
As an example of these terms being used in a project, consider a Summit Award project to create a prayer garden for a local church.
• The beneficiary would be the church (a beneficiary does not necessarily have to be a single person; it can be an organization).
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• The project manager would be the Venturer pursuing their Summit Award.
• The stakeholders would be the church parishioners who would use the garden in the future.
• The sponsor would be the person who donates money for the supplies needed for the garden. This could potentially be the same person/organization that is the beneficiary, but could also be a separate donor.
• The team members would be all those who help build the garden. • The vendors would be people such as a contractor who pours concrete
for a sidewalk, a gardening store that transports truckloads of soil, or an arborist who gives recommendations for ideal trees to be used for a particular location.
Guidelines for Selecting Projects
When it comes time to select a project concept, the task may seem daunting. However, begin by considering the purpose of the project. What are the overarching objectives or goals you would like to achieve? These objectives can be things such as providing a fun event for your crew, helping those affected by a hurricane, modernizing a particular elementary school, etc.
Once you have a general idea of what you want to accomplish, consider more specific projects that will fit that need. In our previous examples, these specific projects may be planning a weekend ski trip for your crew, gathering hurricanerelief supplies to send to the Red Cross, and painting the walls of the school’s main hallway.
Ensure that your project concept follows the guidelines for being a true project. Remember that it does not necessarily have to be permanent; however, it must be “durable”, meaning that it must last for its defined period of existence in a sustainable manner. In the abstract sense, your project must have a beginning and an end, in addition to yielding distinct or unique products (which may be tangible or intangible).
At a later point, you will craft a project scope statement, which will solidify this project concept into a defined, achievable plan. For now, however, just think about overall goals and objectives for your potential project.
Team Activity
Divide participants into small collaborative teams. They will break out into these same teams at various points throughout the training, so it may be helpful to encourage them to sit together throughout the lessons. During this first breakout, ask them to decide on a hypothetical project theme; as they progress through the following lessons within this training, they will be applying the project steps they
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learn to plan this hypothetical project with their team. Ensure that they choose a realistic and specific project that they may encounter, such as planning a certain “Tier III” Venturing super activity, planning a service project for their chartering organization, starting a council Venturing Officers’ Association, etc. Once they select a project, ask them to first discuss why it qualifies as a project. They explain what impact their project will have, and why that is a needed aspect of the beneficiary’s operations. Then, they should discuss which persons/organizations would fall into each of the project roles (beneficiary, sponsor, stakeholders, possible vendors, etc.). Each team should then briefly present to the whole group a summary of what they have discussed.
Review
Evaluate participant understanding of the following points: § What is the definition of a project? § What qualifies as a project? § Who is responsible for the execution of a project?
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PLANNING
Time: 45 minutes
Learning Objectives
As a result of this module, participants will: • Explain the value of documenting service hours. • Apply the Planning Process. • Explain the process of forming a project budget. • Practice planning skills in a project context.
Logging Hours
Documenting your project is very important. The foremost reasons for documenting any process is that it reduces confusion and also allows you to quantify the effort required for a specific task. These documents act as the database of organizational knowledge throughout the duration of the project, and the stored information can be accessed in the future by others. It is recommended to log all project hours, including the ones used in the planning of the project. These can be used for:
• The core Venturing awards: service hours are required for the Discovery, Pathfinder, and Summit Awards. These service hours should be tracked by the individual Venturers as they progress through the recognition system.
• Journey to Excellence: these hours can be entered by a representative of the crew (usually the advisor or president) at http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/Awards/JourneyToExcellence.
• Messengers of Peace: this international program tracks service projects around the globe (http://www.scouting.org/messengersofpeace.aspx).
• Future projects: others looking to plan similar projects in the future can use your records as a resource or aid when planning their own project.
When logging hours, Venturers will need the following information: • Basic project description. • Date of the project. • Number of people participating (may be broken down into categories of Scouts vs. non-Scouts, youth vs. adults). • Total hours worked.
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Planning Process Steps
We will begin by giving an overview of the steps you will take during the planning process, and then go through each step individually in more detail, and give you the chance to practice on your team projects.
1. Define the Activity: The first step of planning a successful project is deciding “what exactly do I want to accomplish?”. Talk to key stakeholders, donors, and sponsors to get an idea of their needs and expectations, and what your project should entail.
2. Next, Define Resources: This conversation with key stakeholders, donors, and sponsors will give you an idea of what materials and services they are willing to provide, and you will determine what other resources you will need to gather from other sources. This step includes the beginning of a project budget.
3. Next, identify and Consider Alternatives: List out some specific tasks and determine if there are other options that will allow you to be successful in your project.
4. Next, Commit to Writing by creating a Scope Statement. This will finalize and record the details of what precisely the project will cover, including an estimated timeline for each project component. This will get everyone on the same page, and reduce the chances of costly miscommunications, while holding the project to a schedule.
5. Lastly, Promote the Plan by communicating the timelines of the project to members of the team. This can also include presenting the plan to key stakeholder, sponsors, or beneficiaries for approval.
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ProjectProject ManagementPersonPlanningProjects